Page 2 of 2

Re: Zoe charging

Posted: Tue, 16 Oct 2018, 18:09
by g4qber
There are 43kw Ac chargers in WA on the RACWA Electric Highway

https://www.drivezero.com.au/charging/l ... c-highway/

Re: Zoe charging

Posted: Tue, 16 Oct 2018, 18:50
by doggy
This is correct. The R90 and R110 are 22kW charge.

The Q90 is 43kW charge but not available in Australia.

However, the regen charges at up to 41kW when you use the brake pedal as well as taking your foot off the accelerator.

If you look at the real world charge rates I published at the top of this thread you will see that 43kW charging would not buy a huge amount of time because of the battery acceptance rate. I think my estimate was a mere 30mins on a full charge.

Cheers,
Dave

Re: Zoe charging

Posted: Mon, 29 Apr 2019, 08:06
by doggy
Just an explanatory note on what is now an old thread.
Even though the max charge rate is 22kW, Regen is 43kW, which is rather nice.
The charge rate for the Q90 (not available here is 43kW) but the R90 (which we have) is 22kW.
The change to 22 was made in conjunction with the bigger battery. However it was done so as to improve efficiency at the low end of charging not because of heat.
After more measurement since I first started this thread, for single phase, if you assume a fixed overhead of about 800watts in the Zoe charger plus about 20W loss per amp, your calculations of efficiency will be reasonably accurate. That is assuming the aircon does not need to run. If it is a very hot summer day and/or you are just back from a long run, the aircon can easily use up another 600+watts cooling the battery. Then, charging at 6A becomes fairly useless so you are better off upping the amps or waiting until everything is cooler. Of course, this gets more complicated if you are juggling exported/excess solar and time of day.
Regards,
Dave

Re: Zoe charging

Posted: Mon, 29 Apr 2019, 10:39
by LouB
Yes, regen at up to 43kW is very nice.
It is really surprising to see the estimated range increasing so rapidly when travelling downhill with brakes on.

So far we have only recharged at home from a single phase EVSE that provides 7.4kW max., and we never even use that maximum rate because we try to charge 100% from part of solar array which produces 6.4 kW max. So, for the most part, the Zoe is charged at rates varying between 3.0 and 5.5 kWh. We have not found it at all inconvenient, and the battery is always adequately charged for the trips we need to do.

By the way, when it comes to solar we only have total generation of just over 10 kW max and that, with help from an 9.8 kW house battery, has been sufficient to completely power the ZOE, the house, my shed workshop, and 2 battery electric lawn mowers. Moreover, with every quarter we are piling up more credit with our electricity grid energy retailer.
I believe that as more and more people install roof-top PV solar + battery, many more will also be getting EVs because the two really complement each other.

Re: Zoe charging

Posted: Mon, 29 Apr 2019, 10:55
by doggy
Hi Lou,
Yes, that is great and so true.
My system is 4.3kW max, very shaded by trees, faces ENE and quite expensive because I have Enphase inverters on every panel. Even despite that, we only use minimal grid and the system is still cost effective- though more a 9yr payback rather than what is obtainable under better conditions. My OpenEVSE does a good job of adjusting to the excess solar and for 8 months Zoe ran 98% on solar. However, with the lower sun angles I am more frequently charging Zoe at 6-7amps which is not very efficient at all. I already have my own 4.6kW lithium battery (24V, based on CALB 180s) which has been working well and runs all computers, modems, CCTV and servers in my house pretty much 24/7. I am now working on a bigger version of the charger and BMS I designed to power up my 8 AVASS cells (11.8kW). I intend to charge them during the day and then when required, pump Zoe from a 5kW inverter. The losses seem to stack up okay and make this more efficient than putting energy into Zoe at low amperages. Also, Zoe is frequently driven when excess solar conditions are best. The system will also be a backup for when those multi-hour power outages occur. It would not be cost effective if I'd paid retail for the Lithiums, but a fitting use for those rescued from the bus project. My CALBs came from SuziAuto and a customer who lost confidence in the cells even though the fault was in his controller, so their price was reasonable.
Cheers,
Dave