New to the forum & new I-miev

Mitsubishi EV Interest Group
User avatar
offgridQLD
Senior Member
Posts: 1825
Joined: Tue, 23 Jul 2013, 16:05
Real Name: Kurt
Location: Fleurieu Peninsula, SA

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by offgridQLD » Mon, 28 Apr 2014, 22:20

Yes that would offset your Imiev and someImage

There are a lot of homes with oversized grid feed arrays that are on a low feed in tariff that would benefit from owning a EV to consume all the extra energy rather than feed it back to the grid for peanuts.

Kurt    

User avatar
offgridQLD
Senior Member
Posts: 1825
Joined: Tue, 23 Jul 2013, 16:05
Real Name: Kurt
Location: Fleurieu Peninsula, SA

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by offgridQLD » Mon, 28 Apr 2014, 22:22

Yes that would offset your Imiev and someImage

There are a lot of homes with oversized grid feed arrays that are on a low feed in tariff that would benefit from owning an EV to consume all the extra energy rather than feed it back to the grid for peanuts.

Kurt    

User avatar
carnut1100
Groupie
Posts: 334
Joined: Tue, 24 Feb 2009, 16:39
Real Name: Greg Milligan
Location: Brisbane
Contact:

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by carnut1100 » Tue, 29 Apr 2014, 01:35

I have 5kw of grid connect on a 1:1 feed in tariff...

Troglodyte
Groupie
Posts: 97
Joined: Sun, 26 Jan 2014, 14:37
Real Name: Troglodyte

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by Troglodyte » Tue, 29 Apr 2014, 01:43

10kw grid-connect on the June v2011 52c Fit and currently collecting bits for another 2kw off-grid so I can sell virtually the full output of the 10kw system. Still room for another 2kw before I'm out of roof space.

User avatar
offgridQLD
Senior Member
Posts: 1825
Joined: Tue, 23 Jul 2013, 16:05
Real Name: Kurt
Location: Fleurieu Peninsula, SA

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by offgridQLD » Tue, 29 Apr 2014, 02:19

Our system is more to do with self sufficiency than making or saving money.

The several hundred thousand it would have cost to bring a mains cable in was a factor . Not that I would connect to it even if mains was offered for free.

Kurt

Last edited by offgridQLD on Mon, 28 Apr 2014, 16:20, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
offgridQLD
Senior Member
Posts: 1825
Joined: Tue, 23 Jul 2013, 16:05
Real Name: Kurt
Location: Fleurieu Peninsula, SA

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by offgridQLD » Thu, 01 May 2014, 16:08

A couple of new pics of the I miev around the house.

Exiting the shed all charged up from the sun.

Image

Out on the front lawn after a wash.

Image


User avatar
Adverse Effects
Senior Member
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sat, 01 Jan 2011, 03:30
Real Name: Adverse Effects
Location: Brisbane

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by Adverse Effects » Thu, 01 May 2014, 18:22

gosh i dont know

all you guys posting electronic porn

LOL

Brenda
Noobie
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu, 24 Apr 2014, 23:07
Real Name: Brenda Dobia
Location: New South Wales

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by Brenda » Mon, 05 May 2014, 11:09

Seems like 'new to the forum and new I-miev' is the place to start. A little daunting to be joining the discussion with all of you, but I would value any advice.
I have been wanting to make the switch to an e-vehicle for some time. Now with my old ICE in its twilight I found a 2012 i-Miev for just under $20K. It has 25,000 on the clock, but all seems to be in order and warranty in place. So I've put a deposit on it and just waiting on bank paperwork.
A little scary given I live in the mid Blue Mountains and work in Penrith. It's only about 40k, but a serious uphill run all the way home.
On occasion I have to go to Parramatta for work, which is further 32k.
Any advice on managing the uphill run?
Any Sydney-based i-Mievers with tips on recharging options around the city and Western suburbs?
Brenda

User avatar
offgridQLD
Senior Member
Posts: 1825
Joined: Tue, 23 Jul 2013, 16:05
Real Name: Kurt
Location: Fleurieu Peninsula, SA

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by offgridQLD » Mon, 05 May 2014, 13:46

Hi Brenda,
          Welcome to the forum and congrats on the new Imiev.

Your 40km trip to work should be fine.More or less downhill all the way there. If you start off from home with 100% charge then you should arrive at work 40km down hill with close to 100%. Then you only need to make it home 40km. Yes going back up the hill but with a almost full battery I don't see that being a problem.

Just as an example (using a online application that calculates range) I don't know your exact location in the BM so I typed in Katoomba to Penrith 44.7km distance 89 km return. It's one hell of a climb on the way back 1000m elevation ! It's showing you would have roughly 26% SOC when you get home.

lucky the Imiev has very good regenerative braking so you should be abe to get to penrith charging your battery all the way

elevation graph of return trip
Image


This consumption (on your trip home) depends on how fast you're driving (not sure what the speed limit was most of the way.

Or one way to look at it if you head off from Penrith with 100% SOC (full battery) you will arrive in Katoomba with roughly 38% SOC. So its going home where you need to be prepared with enough charge.

Parramatta to Katoomba is pushing the limits. If you could leave Parramatta with 100% soc (charge there) you would arrive in Katoomba with roughly 15% SOC. You want to try and keep it at or above 20% SOC.I think this trip on one charge is pushing things too much.

That said I do a weekly 104km trip to the Sunshine coast hinterland that the online application has be down as having 12% SOC by the end. By taking it easy (not taking the freeway) I get there with 20 - 22% SOC so it's achievable but its on the limit i like to push to.

Kurt
Last edited by offgridQLD on Mon, 05 May 2014, 04:02, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Gabz
Senior Member
Posts: 580
Joined: Thu, 08 Aug 2013, 03:30
Real Name: Gabriel Noronha
Location: Maitland NSW
Contact:

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by Gabz » Mon, 05 May 2014, 15:03

Welcome

for starters get yourself a chargepoint card/account Chargepoint register

it's free and will give you access to a couple nissian dealership chargepoints near penrith and parramatta. just ask the dealership first every Nissan dealership that sell and service the Nissan LEAF is required to have a chargepoint but not all let them be publicly used. it depends on the dealer.

close to Parramatta is NSW only level 3 EV charger this should very quickly charge your car. pictures and map of charger location

3rdly you might want to think about enquirer about charging at work this would remove any anxiety you would have about getting home
Last edited by Gabz on Mon, 05 May 2014, 05:07, edited 1 time in total.
Corporate Member Recharging NSW Pty Ltd. http://rechargingnsw.com.au/

Brenda
Noobie
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu, 24 Apr 2014, 23:07
Real Name: Brenda Dobia
Location: New South Wales

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by Brenda » Mon, 05 May 2014, 17:24

Hi Kurt, Thanks for the great info. Image Much appreciated.
I live in Hazelbrook, which is only 675 metres and 16kms closer to Sydney than Katoomba. While I'm being more precise (which I can see I will have to get used to!) work is just the other side of Penrith, in Kingswood, so that makes it 38.7kms from home. Hopefully that will give me just that little bit more charge if coming home from Parramatta.
While I'm thinking about getting set up does anyone have experience/advice on the pros and cons of having a regular 15amp outlet installed at home vs one of the special Chargepoint or Origin charging stations? I am thinking about safety as my carport is underneath my daughter's bedroom in a wooden studio. Also thinking about best ways of connecting to my solar system. Please feel free to point me to another post or forum if it's all been covered before.
Cheers, Brenda

Brenda
Noobie
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu, 24 Apr 2014, 23:07
Real Name: Brenda Dobia
Location: New South Wales

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by Brenda » Mon, 05 May 2014, 17:31

Many thanks. I have downloaded the Chargepoint app. Looks like I should be able to swing something with the dealer in Penrith - especially since they are a multi-make dealer and also will be my Mitsubishi service centre. The sustainability manager at my work is a good friend of mine, so I'm about to put the hard word on her as well.

User avatar
Gabz
Senior Member
Posts: 580
Joined: Thu, 08 Aug 2013, 03:30
Real Name: Gabriel Noronha
Location: Maitland NSW
Contact:

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by Gabz » Mon, 05 May 2014, 17:42

Brenda wrote:
While I'm thinking about getting set up does anyone have experience/advice on the pros and cons of having a regular 15amp outlet installed at home vs one of the special Chargepoint or Origin charging stations? I am thinking about safety as my carport is underneath my daughter's bedroom in a wooden studio.
there is no or origin sell chargepoint charging stations.

the main reason for a dedicate one over a 15amp power point is convince of not having to get the cable out of the boot and plugging it in. (if you take it with you mine cable stays at home mostly)

if you pay a licensed electrician there is nothing to worry about with safety, both solutions electrically would be considered equally as safe. especially if you buy a IP56 (industrial and waterproof) rated powerpoint.

If your after an electrician who knows what he's talking about EV wise blue mountains solar owns a LEAF and velocity electrical also own a LEAF. but there is nothing overly special to do so you can use who you want.

links:
http://www.velocityelectrical.com.au/ev ... oints.html
http://bluemountainssolar.com.au/nissan ... ctric-car/
Last edited by Gabz on Mon, 05 May 2014, 07:45, edited 1 time in total.
Corporate Member Recharging NSW Pty Ltd. http://rechargingnsw.com.au/

User avatar
Johny
Senior Member
Posts: 3729
Joined: Mon, 23 Jun 2008, 16:26
Real Name: John Wright
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by Johny » Mon, 05 May 2014, 18:07

Brenda wrote:While I'm thinking about getting set up does anyone have experience/advice on the pros and cons of having a regular 15amp outlet installed at home vs one of the special Chargepoint or Origin....
Hi Brenda and welcome to EV land. My 2 cents is that plugging in your EV gets old pretty quickly so the most convenient system is the best.
The 15 Amp outlet will be lot lot cheaper but you will have to unpack and re-pack your EVSE cord all the time.
A good alternative is to buy another EVSE brick(cord) and I gether from recent posts that the Volts one is the cheapest around.

That said the cost difference between another brick cord and a real EVSE - say from clipper creek may be very similar - especially once you take into account the same cost for the electrician. A 15 Amp outlet will run either a brick cord or the mounted EVSE.

There are a few fold on this forum who have played with all of the available EVSEs and can advice of the lowest cost option (not me, I have a DIY EV and use a 15 Amp extension lead).

Once final thing. It drove my family nuts with our single line driveway that the Nissan LEAF always had to have pride of place in the carport because the charge lead didn't reach anywhere else. Toward the end of our 3 month Vic Trial test of the LEAF I ended up making up a 15 Amp extension and using the brick to charge it - to avoid playing out scenes from the Castle in our driveway. Worth thinking about.



User avatar
offgridQLD
Senior Member
Posts: 1825
Joined: Tue, 23 Jul 2013, 16:05
Real Name: Kurt
Location: Fleurieu Peninsula, SA

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by offgridQLD » Mon, 05 May 2014, 18:27

Your situation just keeps getting better. If your blessed with a Fast charge at one location and the potential for a few standard charge points thats great. Not to mention your climb home is almost 1/2 what I predicted and a few km shorter. You will be fine for range.

As for the home charging I 2nd most of what everyone has already mentioned. Personally I would just put a 15A outlet at home. Go for the IP 66 industrial style outlet that you can screw your plug into as the Imievs supplied charge cord has the matching 15A scew plug. It not only locks the plug in place( no one can accidentally pull it out) But its just a more solid outlet all together. Not to mention waterproof/dust proof.

They are not much more expensive than a normal 15A powerpoint. I have a genuine clipsal one at one house and a cheaper brand in my garage at the other house. Both are well made and meet all the standards. The cheaper one will be fine for home use.

$22 delivered to your house you can't go wrong. 7 year warranty


Image



link to ebay 15A outlet
Last edited by offgridQLD on Mon, 05 May 2014, 08:34, edited 1 time in total.

adelaide-ev
Groupie
Posts: 102
Joined: Wed, 24 Oct 2012, 20:05
Real Name: Sally
Location: Adelaide

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by adelaide-ev » Mon, 05 May 2014, 23:41

"I live in Hazelbrook, which is only 675 metres and 16kms closer to Sydney than Katoomba"

You'll be fine with that , Brenda. I often travel a similar climb,600m, to the Adelaide hills with my Imiev and always am able to go further than I expect. The down hill trip is basically a free ride. The Green race app is great for working out distances and altitudes but I have found it gives a conservative estimation of power use.

You will be fine with a 15amp socket at home - no need for expensive origin one, as already mentioned if you need an extra charger to leave hung on the wall at home there are cheaper options.

The only other proviso would be to be careful with heater use (yes I know it will be cold in the mountains - used to live in Sydney) until you have gotten used to judging your range home. The heated seat is a bit of a substitute as it uses a lot less power than the heater, but rug yourself up too.

For summer the air cond uses little power -it's only the heater that chews thru it.

And the RR gauge is only a guess -o- meter -based on your last 25km drive or so. Don't be shocked when it shows less km remaining after your uphill trip home -you will see it increase heading down hill the next morning!

It really doesn't take long to get the hang of it - bit frustrating cycling thru the odometer, RR and trip meter readings while you are acclimatising - wish they were all separate gauges.

I've had my Imiev since December (4000km) and rarely take the charger with me, even on weekend trips to the hills etc. So quickly becomes the new normal, knowing where you can top up and how far to go. Being near a Fast Charger is a bonus - would allow you to get into Sydney and back too. I am near the only one in Adelaide and it does come in handy on occasion.

The warning lights start flashing at 2 bars charge left -this is actually still 22% SOC so don't panic if you're not quite home then!
( 1bar is 17% SOC and turtle light comes on after the last bar at 10.5% SOC - not that I've seen it yet). I found this info comforting to know.

All the best and welcome
Sally
Last edited by adelaide-ev on Mon, 05 May 2014, 13:47, edited 1 time in total.

Peter C in Canberra
Senior Member
Posts: 491
Joined: Sun, 27 Jul 2008, 04:05
Real Name: Peter Campbell
Location: Canberra

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by Peter C in Canberra » Tue, 06 May 2014, 05:10

The 15A outlet suggested above would be fine for at home and leave the Mitsubishi charge cable attached to it. To leave in the car for use elsewhere, get a Holden Volt charge cord. It has a 10A plug so can plug in anywhere and the cable wraps neatly around the box. Others on the forum have noted that the car charges at the same rate with the Volt charge cord or the Mitsubishi cord. The latter seems to only have a 15A plug to be conservative. The car's charger does not draw more than 10A.
Daihatsu charade conversion 2009-18, iMiEV 2013-2019, Holden Volt 2018-present, on the ACT's 100% renewable electricity. Kona on order.

Troglodyte
Groupie
Posts: 97
Joined: Sun, 26 Jan 2014, 14:37
Real Name: Troglodyte

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by Troglodyte » Wed, 14 May 2014, 20:57

Whilst the question is akin to 'how long ia a piece of string', does anyone have a clue as to the life in years / kilometers / whatever of a MiEV / Nissan Leaf battery might be ?? Replacement cost is another issue, but given the number of both vehicles sold somewhere on planet earth, there are probably a few suppliers of batteries from which to choose. I've been searching high and low for a used Leaf & it appears they are virtually all in one fleet or another with at least a year more left in the lease. Mitsubishi isn't really my style although there are plenty of used ones around starting from $17 - 18,000. The (Nissan Leaf) fleet owners I've contacted say they expect to get around $25,000 for theirs at 3 - 4 years old, which strikes me as a much more attractive proposition than a Mitsubishi ... problem is I'll need to wait a year or so. Its not exactly the end of the earth but vehicle running costs are the only significant living expense I have & the budget only increases my desire to become more independent from 'the system'.

User avatar
Johny
Senior Member
Posts: 3729
Joined: Mon, 23 Jun 2008, 16:26
Real Name: John Wright
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by Johny » Wed, 14 May 2014, 21:27

The LEAF's battery life in Melbourne is expected to be 7.5 years to 70% capacity based on 15,000km per year.
The life drops as the temperature increases.
There is a chart somewhere put together from recorded data and extrapolation that shows expected battery life of the LEAF for lots of places throughout the world.

User avatar
offgridQLD
Senior Member
Posts: 1825
Joined: Tue, 23 Jul 2013, 16:05
Real Name: Kurt
Location: Fleurieu Peninsula, SA

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by offgridQLD » Wed, 14 May 2014, 21:32

With the $7,000 difference between a 2nd hand Imiev and a leaf you could put that 7k towards a replacement battery for the Imiev.

Word of mouth has the Imiev battery at $8,000. Though I don't know of anyone who has had to pay for a replacement.

How long a battery will last is a bit of a grey area. When do you call it dead? 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% capacity loss. Its common to call it dead at 20% capacity loss.e

In Australia the I miev battery has a 5 year warranty and in the US it has a * year warrenty. So one would assume it should last at least 8 years. Im working on 10 years and 150 - 200,000km. Most small 4cycl cars are considered kind of 2nd hand and tired by that kind of timeframe and milage.

Kurt

Troglodyte
Groupie
Posts: 97
Joined: Sun, 26 Jan 2014, 14:37
Real Name: Troglodyte

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by Troglodyte » Wed, 14 May 2014, 22:04

Thanks for the responses. Those figures are about what I expected but its nice to have them confirmed. I'm still much more interested in a Leaf than an MiEV as its more like a regular sized vehicle. A mate has a Smart that I've punted around Brisbane a bit & whilst its got more than sufficient get up and go, I never feel comfortable in that thing. Ideally I'd have a Renault Kangoo ZE van or a Citroen Berlingo Electronique but until / unless the federal muppets drop the local vehicle industry protection racket, I can't imagine those being a possibility in OZ.

User avatar
offgridQLD
Senior Member
Posts: 1825
Joined: Tue, 23 Jul 2013, 16:05
Real Name: Kurt
Location: Fleurieu Peninsula, SA

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by offgridQLD » Wed, 14 May 2014, 22:09

A smart is a much much smaller car it's only a two seater.

Kurt

Peter C in Canberra
Senior Member
Posts: 491
Joined: Sun, 27 Jul 2008, 04:05
Real Name: Peter Campbell
Location: Canberra

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by Peter C in Canberra » Wed, 14 May 2014, 22:24

Troglodyte wrote: ...I'm still much more interested in a Leaf than an MiEV as its more like a regular sized vehicle...

Well the Leaf does have 5 seats rather than the iMiEV's 4 but the iMiEV has more than 100L more luggage room than the Leaf with the back seats folded down. The Leaf may LOOK more like a 'regular sized vehicle' but it is not necessarily bigger where it counts.
Last edited by Peter C in Canberra on Wed, 14 May 2014, 12:51, edited 1 time in total.
Daihatsu charade conversion 2009-18, iMiEV 2013-2019, Holden Volt 2018-present, on the ACT's 100% renewable electricity. Kona on order.

User avatar
offgridQLD
Senior Member
Posts: 1825
Joined: Tue, 23 Jul 2013, 16:05
Real Name: Kurt
Location: Fleurieu Peninsula, SA

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by offgridQLD » Wed, 14 May 2014, 22:30

Thats it. I can fit a recumbent trike (3 wheel bicycle) Or a full size (large) 27.5" mountain bike with the front wheel off in the back. I just ran a tape over our samsung front loader washing machine and that would fit in there easy. Even with the front seats all the way back.

carnut1100, another Imiev owner on this forum took this photo of his Imiev next to a smart car

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v164/ ... 7a90df.jpg


There you go just as an example. I just went down and placed a full size fully assembled single arm chair in the back with room to spare. Thats with the two front seats all the way back to. Try doing that with any sedan.

Image

Kurt
Last edited by offgridQLD on Wed, 14 May 2014, 13:01, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
offgridQLD
Senior Member
Posts: 1825
Joined: Tue, 23 Jul 2013, 16:05
Real Name: Kurt
Location: Fleurieu Peninsula, SA

New to the forum & new I-miev

Post by offgridQLD » Wed, 14 May 2014, 23:12

"The LEAF's battery life in Melbourne is expected to be 7.5 years to 70% capacity based on 15,000km per year.
The life drops as the temperature increases."

while all lithium batteries will suffer capacity loss over time and time spent at hot temp is one of the largest contributors.

The leaf battery isn't the best example for long battery life. Given that leaf suffers from a known issue with premature capacity loss due to heat. Why this is the case with the leaf more so than other cars and just how bad it can be is documented all over the net.

This video is worth watching
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxP0Cu00sZs

Kurt
Last edited by offgridQLD on Wed, 14 May 2014, 13:15, edited 1 time in total.

Post Reply