Steve's 2008 Mazda 2 conversion

Post up a thread for your EV. Progress pics, description and assorted alliteration
Post Reply
ZoomZoom
Noobie
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat, 24 Oct 2009, 05:23
Real Name: Steve Rubeck
Location: Perth

Steve's 2008 Mazda 2 conversion

Post by ZoomZoom » Sat, 24 Oct 2009, 06:33

Let me share this good news with you...

The following 24 photographs show the progress of a new 2008 Mazda 2 car being converted to a new 2008 Mazda 2 electric car.

After finding Daniel Booth at the EV Shop in Balcatta, Perth, Western Australia and after a number of meetings, I felt confident he could do a professional job.
The following photos are testament of that.

This will not be a technical story but one from an enthusiast who would visit the workshop every few weeks to
photograph progress and have a de-briefing with Daniel as I tried to keep up with developments.

This is being written by a layman, I believe it represents an ideal introduction to anyone who is curious as to what is involved in an electrical conversion.
It turned out not to be a project undertaken in a week or two using basic tools and common sense.



Image
PHOTO 1
The 2008 Mazda 2 specifically bought to be converted to all electric drive.
I felt the 3 protective rubber stripes were required if one is planning on parking at Shopping Centres.
The pattern was a mirror image of the windows above, something I believe allows them to visually work with the body shape.



Image
PHOTO 2
A three quarter view of the car for a more complete understanding of the Mazda’s total appearance.



Image
PHOTO 3
The Mazda in the EV Shop. Because of my limited knowledge of what was involved with a conversion,
I had complete confidence in Daniel after the number of conversions he has done and was kind enough to talk me through.



Image
PHOTO 4
The first step was to remove unwanted parts.
The components went back to the Mazda dealer as part of the deal for the best changeover price.



Image
PHOTO 5
ImPulse 9 motor attached to the stock 5 speed manual transmission.



Image
PHOTO 6
The smaller gray motor installed to run the compressor for the air-conditioner.



Image
PHOTO 7
View from beneath with the end of the Aircon motor, transmission and quality of construction becoming apparent.



Image
PHOTO 8
Aluminum box under bonnet, above motor to house the majority of components.
The Curtis Controller can be seen inside the box on the left and the recharging unit on the right.



Image
PHOTO 9
As I always preferred a 2 seater car, it was decided to position the battery box in the location of what was the rear seat.
The 45 batteries are Thunder Sky 160 A/H and weigh in at approximately 250 KGs.
Keeping the batteries in one block and close to the centre of the car worked out well in battery safety and vehicle handling.
An interesting fact is that this modern car was made with such light components that the converted car ended up 250 KGs heavier than what it weighed from the factory and would have prevented me from registering it as a 4 seater!



Image
PHOTO 10
To install the aluminum battery box the front seats had to be removed as it could not be installed through the rear tail gate.



Image
PHOTO 11
Viewed through the rear hatch you can see the spare tyre located below the floor of the rear storage space which remained unchanged from when the rear seat was in place.



Image
PHOTO 12
Close up of structural bracing on battery box and battery management system installed.



Image
PHOTO 13
Shot from the rear of the vehicle forward, with the spare tyre well and space left by petrol tank.



Image
PHOTO 14
The two black plates with four bolts anchor the battery box to frame. Also seen are the electrical cables running forward,
down the central tunnel with a protective plate underneath.



Image
PHOTO 15
Just in front of the protective plate and behind the motor is a circuit breaker with a second circuit breaker located in the box under the bonnet.



Image
PHOTO 16
Carpet on floor and battery box sides, the Perspex protective sheet and carpet on top have not yet been installed to complete the box visually.



Image
PHOTO 17
The 15 Amp connection found behind the petrol cap door.



Image
PHOTO 18
The black cylindrical component to the rear of the box under the bonnet is the electric vacuum pump for the power breaks.



Image
PHOTO 19
A view with all the components in the box installed under the bonnet.



Image
PHOTO 20
With protective Perspex cover and 4 ventilation fans installed,
it was at this point it became obvious converting a car to electric is a bit more complex than one might think!
(Full credit to the ones doing their own conversions).



Image
PHOTO 21
Attached to the right side of the box under the bonnet at front is the new smaller 12 volt battery and to the rear is a cylindrical container and filler cap which is the heater/demister.



Image
PHOTO 22
Because of the electronics found in such a new car, two problems that held up completion were getting the proper signal to the power steering and tachometer.
While the power steering problem was solved by creating a new electronic chip,
the tachometer in the dash from the factory had to be bypassed and a replacement now resides above the fuel gauge on the windscreen pillar.



Image
PHOTO 23
As the car remains basically stock in appearance, I thought a DURACELL gear shift knob would break up the visual monotony,
most people smile when they see it.



Image
PHOTO 24
The proud owner before driving it home from the EV Shop. Image


I have been keeping daily records of distance traveled, recharging times and running costs calculations,
so in the near future I will be posting the findings for anyone who may be interested.   

Steve
Mazda 2 electric car conversion. On the road every day and loving it.

User avatar
woody
Senior Member
Posts: 1713
Joined: Sat, 21 Jun 2008, 02:03
Real Name: Anthony Wood
Location: Mt Colah

Steve's 2008 Mazda 2 conversion

Post by woody » Sat, 24 Oct 2009, 19:11

Hi Steve,

looks like a thoroughly professional job. How much did Mazda give you for the unwanted bits?

cheers,
Woody
Planned EV: '63 Cortina using AC and LiFePO4 Battery Pack

User avatar
coulomb
Site Admin
Posts: 3721
Joined: Thu, 22 Jan 2009, 20:32
Real Name: Mike Van Emmerik
Location: Brisbane
Contact:

Steve's 2008 Mazda 2 conversion

Post by coulomb » Sun, 25 Oct 2009, 14:48

It's so clean! Looks like it didn't have enough km on the clock to get any oil or even dirt anywhere.

It makes a most pleasant change from the 10-20 year old conversions!

I look forward to more updates. I'm particularly interested in the air conditioning auxilliary motor, e.g. its specs (DC or AC, voltage and power, what controller is used for it, etc).

Excellent photos; well done and thanks!   Image
Nissan Leaf 2012 with new battery May 2019.
5650 W solar, 2xPIP-4048MS inverters, 16 kWh battery.
1.4 kW solar with 1.2 kW Latronics inverter and FIT.
160 W solar, 2.5 kWh 24 V battery for lights.
Patching PIP-4048/5048 inverter-chargers.

User avatar
Simon
Senior Member
Posts: 431
Joined: Sun, 19 Aug 2007, 19:38
Real Name: Simon
Location: Perth WA
Contact:

Steve's 2008 Mazda 2 conversion

Post by Simon » Sun, 25 Oct 2009, 20:13

Nice!
Steve could you add some more of the specifications? Did you keep the clutch? What Wh/km are you getting?
I like your gear knob! Image
Coulomb I think the aux motor runs without a controller.

a4x4kiwi
Senior Member
Posts: 772
Joined: Thu, 03 Jan 2008, 19:04
Real Name: Malcolm Faed
Location: Australia
Contact:

Steve's 2008 Mazda 2 conversion

Post by a4x4kiwi » Sun, 25 Oct 2009, 22:11

Hi Steve,
Nice work. I would be interested to know if there were any problems, with inspection or technical, around ensuring the Air Bags and ABS are still be functional.

Cheers,
Mal.
Silicon is just sand with attitude.

Blog: http://malfunction.faed.name

ZoomZoom
Noobie
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat, 24 Oct 2009, 05:23
Real Name: Steve Rubeck
Location: Perth

Steve's 2008 Mazda 2 conversion

Post by ZoomZoom » Mon, 26 Oct 2009, 23:19

Hi Steve,
looks like a thoroughly professional job. How much did Mazda give you for the unwanted bits?
Woody

Woody,
Thanks for my first question, one I am unable to answer.I had a changeover price involving the car being traded in but no Mazda dealer in Perth would agree to it. When I mentioned I would not be needing the engine, one dealer was able to meet my price and the papers were signed. Unfortunately the negotiations were a bit complex and as one might expect when dealing with a car salesman, an actual dollar amount was never mentioned!

Sorry for the non answer,
Steve
   Image
Mazda 2 electric car conversion. On the road every day and loving it.

ZoomZoom
Noobie
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat, 24 Oct 2009, 05:23
Real Name: Steve Rubeck
Location: Perth

Steve's 2008 Mazda 2 conversion

Post by ZoomZoom » Mon, 26 Oct 2009, 23:54

It's so clean! Looks like it didn't have enough km on the clock to get any oil or even dirt anywhere.
It makes a most pleasant change from the 10-20 year old conversions!
I look forward to more updates. I'm particularly interested in the air conditioning auxiliary motor, e.g. its specs (DC or AC, voltage and power, what controller is used for it, etc...).
Excellent photos; well done and thanks!

I drove the car for 6 months prior to giving it to the EV Shop and it had 5,000 KM on the clock!.....As far as information relating to the A/C motor, I just received confirmation that Daniel at the EV Shop that he is quite happy to answer the technical questions as he is the one that did all the work!(I just drive and enjoy it).   evshop@iinet.net.au
Steve Image
Mazda 2 electric car conversion. On the road every day and loving it.

ZoomZoom
Noobie
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat, 24 Oct 2009, 05:23
Real Name: Steve Rubeck
Location: Perth

Steve's 2008 Mazda 2 conversion

Post by ZoomZoom » Tue, 27 Oct 2009, 01:57

Nice!
Steve could you add some more of the specifications? Did you keep the clutch? What Wh/km are you getting?
I like your gear knob!

Simon,
The clutch remains. The motor has been limited to 5,500 RPM. In 1st I can go a little over 40 KPH, in 2nd a little over 80 KPH, in 3rd 120 KPH and I've never tried 4th or 5th. It usually stays in 2nd or 1st if I need to get away a little quicker or starting up a hill. Obviously highway driving is done in 3rd.

Steve Image
Mazda 2 electric car conversion. On the road every day and loving it.

ZoomZoom
Noobie
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat, 24 Oct 2009, 05:23
Real Name: Steve Rubeck
Location: Perth

Steve's 2008 Mazda 2 conversion

Post by ZoomZoom » Tue, 27 Oct 2009, 02:17

Hi Steve,
Nice work. I would be interested to know if there were any problems, with inspection or technical, around ensuring the Air Bags and ABS are still be functional.
Cheers,
Mal.

Hi Mal,
Looking at the site is seems just about all are doing the conversions themselves, I seem to be the odd one out having the work done(I know getting there is half the fun but...) If by inspection you are referring to getting the car re-registered as a 2 seater, according to Daniel since he has been over the pits a number of times with other conversions, it was no problem.......As for your Air Bags and ABS questions, Daniel told me he is willing to answer them so please contact him on evshop@iinet.net.au

Steve   Image
Mazda 2 electric car conversion. On the road every day and loving it.

User avatar
coulomb
Site Admin
Posts: 3721
Joined: Thu, 22 Jan 2009, 20:32
Real Name: Mike Van Emmerik
Location: Brisbane
Contact:

Steve's 2008 Mazda 2 conversion

Post by coulomb » Wed, 28 Oct 2009, 15:10

Remember that auxilliary motor:

Image

Daniel replied to my question about it, and kindly gave permission to repost it. Please respect his wish to address any questions about this to him personally; don't expect him to reply on this forum.
Daniel Booth of EV Shop wrote: Hi Mike

I will try to answer your questions the best I can, as I am at home at the moment and don't have all the part numbers with me.

It is a DC permanent magnet motor
It is about 1.1kw constant rating
It is rated at 180 volts but running at 144 on Steve's Mazda 2
No controller is required, direct connection via contactor and fuse to battery pack
They are around $1000
We are a reseller of this product and are able to supply on request

We have tried a few different options over the years. This is a cost effective way of running power steering and air conditioning on EV's. This is a full wash down motor, well sealed and even after an hour or so of use there is minimal heat. This motor has a nominal rpm of around 3,000rpm. We gear it down with a smaller pulley to give just under 1,000rpm at the power steering and a/c compressor, which is an efficient rpm for these units condsidering these have been for small vehicles (eg: small compressor). Idle current draw at 144 volts with no power steering and a/c load is around 2-3amps, with full power steering and a/c load at around 17amps. Which is above recommend constant current draw, but a well working a/c system should only have a maximum duty cycle no more than 70%. Some people have mentioned brush wear, these are an industrial motor designed for 1,000's of hours of use. I have pulled a lower rated motor down after a lot of use and the brushes were just wearing in. We have fitted numerous of these units running power steering and a/c (Steve's Mazda 2 only runs the a/c) with no problems at all.

I am happy if you wish to post this reply on the forum, but would like to ask any people with questions to give me a call as I am only a 2 finger typist and I would rather discuss matter is person. (08) 9240 7869.

Thanks

Daniel Booth
EV Shop
Edit: more compact images side by side
Last edited by coulomb on Wed, 28 Oct 2009, 04:20, edited 1 time in total.
Nissan Leaf 2012 with new battery May 2019.
5650 W solar, 2xPIP-4048MS inverters, 16 kWh battery.
1.4 kW solar with 1.2 kW Latronics inverter and FIT.
160 W solar, 2.5 kWh 24 V battery for lights.
Patching PIP-4048/5048 inverter-chargers.

User avatar
Taffy
Groupie
Posts: 238
Joined: Mon, 23 Jun 2008, 15:12
Real Name: Taffy Flynn
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

Steve's 2008 Mazda 2 conversion

Post by Taffy » Thu, 29 Oct 2009, 15:03

Hi Steve,

Amazing looking conversion, enjoy it! It does not matter how you got it, just that you now have it.

Also agree that the strips match the car very well. The in look at the moment is the white and black.

cheers,
Taffy

Post Reply