The death of Peak Oil (according to Kohler)

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coulomb
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The death of Peak Oil (according to Kohler)

Post by coulomb » Thu, 01 Mar 2012, 04:44

An interesting read:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-02-29/k ... ts/3859118

In short, Alan Kohler predicts the death of Peak Oil and the resurrection of the United States as a manufacturing economy.

"One thing is for sure: the world isn't running out of oil and gas any more."

First comment: "Oh dear, another inconvenient truth for the peak oil alarmists!"

Sigh.

Well, if the US did find a way to get around the environmental obstacles and produced a lot of cheap shale oil and/or gas, that really would be inconvenient. In so many ways.

Another classic quote: "Where there's oil, there's a way". Sadly, I think that will be true.
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The death of Peak Oil (according to Kohler)

Post by bladecar » Thu, 01 Mar 2012, 13:11

Yes.

It seems that whether there is oil, or not, has been the big question we've all been struggling with.



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The death of Peak Oil (according to Kohler)

Post by Johny » Thu, 01 Mar 2012, 14:31

Bush started it but Obama now has to to decide, or figure out how to please the most people:
http://www.usnews.com/opinion/blogs/on- ... y-security

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The death of Peak Oil (according to Kohler)

Post by bga » Wed, 07 Mar 2012, 02:43

I think Alan's been reading the shale gas prospectuses (prospectii?) that paint an overly-optimistic picture of the resources.

Even the mighty Gulf of Mexico oil and gas deposits only succeeded in reversing the USA's post-peak oil production decline for a couple of years. It's hard to see shale oil or Canadian tar sands doing even that much.

See this story on The Oil Drum
After The Gold Rush: A Perspective on Future U.S. Natural Gas Supply and Price

It would seem that the talk of the death of peak oil is considerably exaggerated and it is more likely that the result will be that Kohler's group of cohorts caught completely flat-footed by the eventual peak and the following terminal decline.
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The death of Peak Oil (according to Kohler)

Post by coulomb » Wed, 07 Mar 2012, 03:24


Ah, thanks!

I don't think I've often been so glad to be wrong. (Or at least, lazy about researching what I post.)

I wonder what happens to all the extracting equipment when a well becomes uneconomic. I would imagine it just stays there and rusts, remaining an eyesore for generations. Maybe the companies will take out the equipment and put it somewhere else, but with thousands of wells and declining opportunities, eventually there will be a lot of "oil junk". Even if they do move the equipment on, I imagine that there would be a lot of methane (a really bad global warming gas) that escapes into the atmosphere.

I pity the poor farmer who has this done to his land, possibly against his will. It's probably not even economic to take the equipment away for scrap.
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The death of Peak Oil (according to Kohler)

Post by bga » Wed, 07 Mar 2012, 04:30

There was another about the dodgy economics of the shale gas/oil producers in the United States:

Gas Boom Goes Bust

Coal seam gas is probably cheaper to exploit but, in my opinion, has significantly worse issues with ground water contamination and figitive emissions because of the comparitively shallow nature of the coal seams.

I would expect a legacy of methane seeps along with leaking wells and pipes. Time will tell...
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The death of Peak Oil (according to Kohler)

Post by markrmarkr » Tue, 19 Jun 2012, 18:21

The thing that always annoys me about these oil discussions is when someone starts talking about all the money that's being sent over seas to pay for oil. This is such an over simplification. To a large extent the oil companies own the foreign oil in the middle east and elsewhere. Note how Kohler's article talks about BHP Billiton's acquisitions in the US. And who owns the oil companies? Why we do, that is the West does.   Buying oil is largely an exercise in moving money from one western pocket to another.

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