Required qualifications for EV installation work

Technical discussion on converting internal combustion to electric
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Stiive
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Required qualifications for EV installation work

Post by Stiive » Sat, 15 Jun 2013, 06:27

Some might find this interesting.

I had been concerned that I could not install EV equipment for a client without relevant electrician licenses.
For instance, at a work site, you're not allowed to disconnect or reconnect a line motor without a license - however an EV is not a fixed installation and is therefore not directly covered in the act.

I looked up getting a license, but looks like there's no fast track and the only way is to do a 4year apprenticeship. (Seems silly that i am qualified to design a controller, but not to turn it on once its built!). So I contacted ESV to see if I could get, or needed, a 'Restricted Electrical Workers License'See here.


I got this response
"We confirm an Electric Vehicle is not considered to be a fixed installation as defined by the Electricity Safety Act 1998. Therefore as a vehicle, it is considered transportable and not affixed to land, and therefore does not have a licence requirement to install or maintain such equipment.     
Accordingly, we would expect that suitably qualified and trained persons would work on such equipment, in order to work on such equipment safely."


Good news :)
Note: I guess this advice is only valid for Victoria (even though the standard is Aus wide). No idea about the other states' laws/interpretations.
This should only matter if your installing for a client though and not DIY.
Last edited by Stiive on Fri, 14 Jun 2013, 20:29, edited 1 time in total.
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jonescg
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Required qualifications for EV installation work

Post by jonescg » Sat, 15 Jun 2013, 06:41

There is still the issue of working on an auto mobile. If you do paid work on someone's car as a registered business, qualifications such as auto electrician or mechanic are expected. I think provided at least one person at the business has a qualification recognised by the MTA and they oversee all the work, you should be right. I'd like to know for sure though.
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BigMouse
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Required qualifications for EV installation work

Post by BigMouse » Sat, 15 Jun 2013, 15:49

jonescg wrote: There is still the issue of working on an auto mobile. If you do paid work on someone's car as a registered business, qualifications such as auto electrician or mechanic are expected. I think provided at least one person at the business has a qualification recognised by the MTA and they oversee all the work, you should be right. I'd like to know for sure though.


I've been curious about this for a while. I'm not sure how this all works in Australia, as no formal qualifications are required in the US. You can get a qualification there, but it's only a marketing tool as far as I could tell. People might be more comfortable with a "qualified" mechanic working on their car. There might also be insurance arrangements tied to it as well. I'm not sure.

What are the consequences of an "unqualified" person working on somebody else's car in Australia? Is it illegal?
Last edited by BigMouse on Sat, 15 Jun 2013, 05:51, edited 1 time in total.

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jonescg
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Required qualifications for EV installation work

Post by jonescg » Sat, 15 Jun 2013, 16:03

I think the proverbial hits the fan if someone has an accident which can be traced back to poor workmanship on their vehicle. If the mechanic was not suitably qualified and recognised by the MTA as an authorised mechanic, your business is liable. Apprentices are covered under the arrangement, provided there is a qualified mechanic to oversee the work.
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acmotor
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Required qualifications for EV installation work

Post by acmotor » Sat, 15 Jun 2013, 22:35

Just some thoughts...

1) I asked an insurance company spokesman why business public liability insurance is so cheap compared with nearly every other type of insurance, by a factor of 10 or 100 !
Answer was, the reality of a successful case of proving that the actions of a person actually causing an accident/injury/loss was extremely low. Few people working on an EV for instance would demonstrate gross negligence.

2) A sparky whose trade skills have been in some cases established by rote in an apprenticeship on AC mains, or an auto electrician who has not been trained in voltages above 24V, is not logically qualified to work on an EV, though may start from a reasonable grounding.

3) The non fixed wiring 'loophole' is in a way fortunate as it has allowed many EV conversions and for much of the design and logic now used by production EVs to have been invented, tied and tested by DIY EV folk over the years.

4) If, and until such stage as there is a bureaucratic brick wall to stifle the general public re EV work then the simple 'do your homework, take reasonable care and do it well' rules applies. You can't be prosecuted for doing a good job !
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Last edited by acmotor on Sat, 15 Jun 2013, 13:17, edited 1 time in total.
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evric
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Required qualifications for EV installation work

Post by evric » Sat, 15 Jun 2013, 23:35

In New Zealand, converted cars have to go through an electrical inspection as well as roadworthy one and one other, I've heard.
Last edited by evric on Sat, 15 Jun 2013, 13:36, edited 1 time in total.
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Required qualifications for EV installation work

Post by Tritium_James » Mon, 17 Jun 2013, 17:24

In Queensland (which is the only state in Australia with a professional engineering registration body) the electrical safety act says that to do electrical work you must be a licensed electrician, or "a professional engineer in the performance of their duties". A "professional engineer" means you're board registered in Queensland and have an RPEQ number.

Several of our European customers have had to have their entire car EMC tested as part of getting their roadworthy. It's a bit more stringent than it is here!

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Required qualifications for EV installation work

Post by Bryce » Tue, 18 Jun 2013, 00:10

Same here in Victoria - it's the 'not fixed wiring' that is the relevent item. In all states, AS3000 is mandated in legislation for fixed wiring installations. You need a licence to work on fixed installations in all states and must apply AS3000 as it is adopted in law for these in all states/territories. Other than that - AS3000 is a good guide for us in EV (as are all Australian Standards) - but unless an AS is mandated in law, it is nothing more than that - a guide. Same for licence: that's set in electrical law under the different state/territory jurisdictions.

NB: closest trade qual to EV's is the old 'electrical fitter'qual. They are the old rail and tram electricians plus big switchboard/control board builders amongst other things.

Hope that helps.

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Required qualifications for EV installation work

Post by carnut1100 » Sun, 14 Jul 2013, 20:08

Queensland have tight rules on electrics.....
Here in Tas for instance I can do appliance test and tag as the rules say that it must be done by a "competent person" and the training course I did on that very subject is considered to be proof of competence (although I think I have learned a LOT more by widely reading and playing with the tester and various appliances than I ever learned in the course...) whoever in Queensland to do the same requires an Electrician's licence.
Here I can do anything I want to an appliance, from putting on a new plug to stripping and rebuilding it, so long as it is tested and tagged after repair. I cannot touch anything that is hardwired to a mains supply though.
I think the high voltage in an EV would come under the same category as a plug in appliance...

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