Toyota Hybrid first edition what can be done

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coulomb
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Toyota Hybrid first edition what can be done

Post by coulomb » Sun, 18 Dec 2011, 15:42

I came across a comparison of what I assume is the NHW11 and NHW20 main motors (MG2s):

Image

From "Development of the Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology".

I have no idea why the NHW11 (and I assume that the NHW10 is similar [ Edit: see Note 1 ]) has such a pronounced double step at low speed; perhaps its a sort of torque boost technique from zero to 500 RPM. Torque for the NHW10 could be about 10% lower, since its MG2 is rated at 30 kW, compared to the NHW11's 33 kW.

[ Edit: For more Prius NHW10 information, see also Simons 1999 Toyota Prius . ]

[ Edit: Note 1: From http://www.pressroom.com.au/pressroom/s ... kit.htm#14, the MG2 torque is 31.1 kg.m (305 Nm) from zero to 940 RPM. So it appears that the NHW10 MG2 doesn't have the "torque boost bump" that the NHW11 model has. ]

Edit: had the wrong title for the paper.
Last edited by coulomb on Sun, 01 Jan 2012, 08:53, edited 1 time in total.
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Toyota Hybrid first edition what can be done

Post by Mr Camouflage » Sat, 31 Dec 2011, 05:03

Replacement (second hand) NHW10 battery on ebay: http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Toyota-Prius ... 0641289042

Also I think i read that the mob in NZ can now do an NHW11 battery conversion into an NHW10.

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Toyota Hybrid first edition what can be done

Post by coulomb » Thu, 05 Jan 2012, 03:50

[url=http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/Mk1_Prius/message/5595 wrote:Ron Hansen, in the Mk_1 Yahoo group[/url]] Anecdotal evidence shows replacement packs installed since 2008 or so
lasting are drastically less than the original packs - like 3 years vs 7
years. This suggest that they are using NOS. Honda engineers that I have
spoken to have confirmed that they reuse the electronics board on the
end, but that they receive the cells assembled in the housing from their
supplier. Where the suppliers get them is a mystery. I think the cells
have been sitting since 2006 or so.

Interestingly, our Prius counterparts are noticing that a similar
decline in longevity has been noticed in replacement prismatic slices
for the later Prius / Camry / Highlander / etc. despite the fact that
Toyota still uses these slices in the 2012 model year.
Wow. This suggests that there may be an opportunity for replacing the NOS (New Old Stock - battery packs that have been sitting on the shelf; unused but not fresh and hence with poor longevity) packs from 2008 and later Prii (that's the official plural of Prius now it seems).

Since the cars will be as young as three years old (and upwards), users may be more willing to spend more money on a proper Lithium Iron Phosphate pack.

In fact, any non-plugin Prius models where the battery fails for any reason will not have a good replacement from Toyota, if the above anecdotal information turns out to be accurate.

It also means that using new NHW20 cells (e.g. in NHW10s) would be a less attractive option. I wonder if the crash in NHW20 packs from Toyota (supposedly originally some $10,000, now perhaps $2300) has anything to do with the NOS issue.

This post (free but slow registration required), which the above is quoted from, tells the sorry story of takeovers and sell-offs that seem to have happened with the NiMH manufacturing business over the last decade:

http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/Mk1 ... ssage/5595

More to think about.
Nissan Leaf 2012 with new battery May 2019.
5650 W solar, 2xPIP-4048MS inverters, 16 kWh battery.
1.4 kW solar with 1.2 kW Latronics inverter and FIT.
160 W solar, 2.5 kWh 24 V battery for lights.
Patching PIP-4048/5048 inverter-chargers.

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