Connecting the Dots

Open for any sort of non-technical discussion regarding EVs
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Nagaman
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Connecting the Dots

Post by Nagaman »

Spelling out exactly why Toyota is doomed - Ford gets it but Mary Barra’s $40 million salary isn’t good expenditure:
https://youtu.be/3t0cfSc_hls



[ Edited Coulomb: added tube tags. ]
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brunohill
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Re: Connecting the Dots

Post by brunohill »

A lot of fleet buyers will not like the idea that every vehicle is different and will want to know exactly what they are paying for. I guess Tesla will never get any defense contracts. Tesla must be the luckiest manufacturer in the world to have customers that are just going to keep accepting what you give them and don't care about consistency.
Nagaman
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Re: Connecting the Dots

Post by Nagaman »

brunohill wrote: Mon, 03 Jan 2022, 21:45 A lot of fleet buyers will not like the idea that every vehicle is different and will want to know exactly what they are paying for. I guess Tesla will never get any defense contracts. Tesla must be the luckiest manufacturer in the world to have customers that are just going to keep accepting what you give them and don't care about consistency.
I guess you are referring to the OTA updates that are now frustrating me also……?
Other than that I look forward to genuine efficient and integrated choice some time in the future.
I fear that may mean China sooner, rather than later.
(Tesla is NASA’s preferred bidder right now and defence contracts will specify operational requirements, but I don’t think Elon Musk is a supporter of the ‘industrial military complex’ Eisenhower warned about)
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brendon_m
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Re: Connecting the Dots

Post by brendon_m »

When the military write an instruction manual they don't want anything to change, ever. The logistics of retraining people or rewriting things is too hard/expensive. Thats why they use a lot of outdated tech/equipment even if it costs more.
So an ever changing product like a Tesla would stress them out. I'm sure NASA don't like SpaceX messing around with their tickets and I bet the Falcon 9 doesn't change much for NASA contracts and I'm sure once starship is certified for NASA it's progress will halt

Eevblog uses it as an example as to why overpriced fluke meters sell
https://youtu.be/ay9wFQAW19Y



I tried to find it and couldn't but there's a good example online somewhere of the air force (?) Instructions on making a cake and it's something stupid like 30 pages long because it goes into detail of every tool, ingredient and the angle of the sun compared to Venus at 2pm on a Thursday in 1956 etc etc
Bukes
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Re: Connecting the Dots

Post by Bukes »

I think that may be a generational thing. And there are still a lot of old men running the military (at least here in australia - go have lunch in the cafe at Russell offices in Canberra to get a feel for the leadership ratio…
It is pretty crucial that every time you launch a missile you know it’s going to work. And that it won’t work accidentally before you launch it. In quality and safety systems the biggest issues are “the unexpected consequences of change”, rather than the changes themselves. But fleet cars that drive your staff around the country don’t need to meet the same engineering standards as missiles launched from fighter jets….
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