PIP-4048MS inverter

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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by xenonhost » Wed, 09 May 2018, 00:26

but I saw in the last firmware update that I can set maximum charging from zero, is it not true?

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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by coulomb » Wed, 09 May 2018, 06:18

xenonhost wrote:
Wed, 09 May 2018, 00:26
but I saw in the last firmware update that I can set maximum charging from zero, is it not true?
Sigh. I'd forgotten that patch; it's one of the earlier ones. So yes, you could use that instead of turning the machine off.

I don't know if the firmware will "idle" some inverters when more paralleled machines are available than needed to fulfil the present load. If not, each paralleled machine is some 50 W each of extra loss that you likely can't use with a 40 Ah battery. That's over 200 W for 4 unused machines. Switching them off will remove this load, whereas setting their maximum charge current to zero will not.
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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by gremlinman » Wed, 09 May 2018, 11:12

coulomb wrote:
Tue, 08 May 2018, 18:16
gremlinman wrote:
Tue, 08 May 2018, 15:31
I am on 73.00b though. I have 8 x 12v 120ah batteries. The led was flashing.
Ah, I failed to remember that you were on 73.00b. Flashing LED, so you are in bulk or absorb. All good.
I thought it would attempt to hold 56v whilst in bulk/absorb.
Sure, it will have 56.4 V as its setpoint. It can't get there straight away, though.
I notice when I charge with generator it usually goes up from ~50v to 56v
Your generator charging must be at a fairly high rate then; a lot more than 600 W of charge power. That will get the internal battery voltage up higher sooner, but will also raise the battery terminal voltage due to internal resistance.
and stays at 56v for a while before hitting 54v and staying there putting 1a into the batteries from the generator.
Right. The time it's at 54 V and ~1 A it would be in float mode.
Am I wrong in assuming when in bulk/absorb mode the voltage should be 56v ?
In bulk mode, assuming a constant charge current, and ignoring internal resistance for a moment, the battery voltage should ramp up roughly linearly (assuming lead acid batteries) from the initial voltage till the 56.4 V setpoint, at which point it changes to absorb mode. It should stay in absorb mode until the battery current drops low, and/or the absorb time has expired (if the absorb timer is used). The battery voltage should be constant at 56.4 V during the absorb stage. Taking into account internal resistance, the battery voltage would be higher than the figure indicated, by perhaps half a volt to over a volt, depending on many factors. Bulk stage will still finish at or near the 56.4 V setting, however. As the charge current reduces during absorb mode, the extra voltage due to internal resistance times charge current will reduce to near enough to zero.

So for the generator to have the voltage shoot up to around 56 V nearly straight away, you really must be overcharging the lead acid batteries. Here I mean charging at too high a current, not to too high a state of charge. They should only be charged at a rate of some 13% of their Ah rating. For example, a 200 Ah lead acid battery should only be charged at about 0.13 x 200 = 26 A. Another way to look at is that it should never be charged faster than 7.7 hours (1/0.13), from empty to full. But of course, lead acid should never be discharged more than about 20%, so more realistically, it should take at least 0.2 x 7.7 = 1.5 hours to take it from 80% to 100% SOC. Don't rely on the PIP's SOC reading for state of charge; it's extremely approximate for lead acid batteries, and completely useless for other chemistries.

Now with the variability of solar charging, the battery voltage will be all over the place, but you should be able to discern a rough ramp from initial voltage to absorb setting voltage during the bulk stage, then a rough plateau near 56.4 V during the absorb stage, followed by a stay at around 54 V after that when it stays in the float stage (unless the battery voltage drops a lot, triggering another bulk/absorb stage pair). Unfortunately, the only way to distinguish between bulk and absorb modes is from the last field of the undocumented Q1 command, though a few monitoring systems display it. But you can't tell from the front panel.

[ Edit: added "all good". ]
[ Edit: added "The battery voltage should be constant at 56.4 V during the absorb stage." ]
Thanks for the info, so in "bulk" mode you will see a rise to 56v and then it is in absorb. I guess the thing which seems weird to me is aren't the batteries full at ~52v for AGM . In bulk mode is the actual batteries voltage still lower than 52v assuming no load? Do you have any links to the technical workings of charging lead acid batteries because I can only seem to find casual explanations for this. Why is there the linear voltage ramp in bulk mode instead of just pumping 56v into it?

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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by coulomb » Wed, 09 May 2018, 16:55

gremlinman wrote:
Wed, 09 May 2018, 11:12
so in "bulk" mode you will see a rise to 56v and then it is in absorb.
Yes.
I guess the thing which seems weird to me is aren't the batteries full at ~52v for AGM .
Battery terminal voltages are a bit weird. 52 V (13.0 V per 12 V module, or 2.167 V per 2 V cell) is indeed a good 100% SOC voltage, but that's a resting voltage. You only see this voltage after several hours of no charge or discharge. Some AGMs may only rest at a lower voltage when full; it depends on many factors including the battery temperature. As soon as you start charging even a little, the terminal voltage shoots up to around 54 V; that's why the float voltage setting is at this voltage. Only a very small current flows into the battery at this voltage. Note that the voltage is a result of the current; to achieve float charge, the charger puts in a small current, say 1 A, and doesn't increase the current any more when the battery reaches 54 V. If there is a load on the battery of 10 A, the charger finds it has to push 11 A into the battery to maintain 54 V. Ten of those amps flow to the load, and the one amp keeps the battery at 54 V instead of 52 V.
In bulk mode is the actual batteries voltage still lower than 52v assuming no load?
No. In bulk mode, the battery terminal voltage rises from 52 V to around 56 V (I have been ignoring the fact that the charger will stop about 0.5 V short of the setting voltage).
Why is there the linear voltage ramp in bulk mode instead of just pumping 56v into it?
You don't "pump in" a voltage; you pump current (amperes, usually called amps) into a battery. You can think of the battery cables as "pipes" carrying electrons instead of water or gas. It's not quite accurate, but near enough. So many electrons have an electric charge called a coulomb; one coulomb of charge per second is an amp. The transfer of that charge to the battery represents energy; this energy causes chemical changes which result in the ideal battery changing its voltage. So bulk mode for the charger is the same as absorb mode; it keeps increasing the current until either it hits its limit or the battery voltage reaches the target. Float mode is much the same, with a different target voltage.
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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by gremlinman » Thu, 10 May 2018, 11:16

coulomb wrote:
Wed, 09 May 2018, 16:55
gremlinman wrote:
Wed, 09 May 2018, 11:12
so in "bulk" mode you will see a rise to 56v and then it is in absorb.
Yes.
I guess the thing which seems weird to me is aren't the batteries full at ~52v for AGM .
Battery terminal voltages are a bit weird. 52 V (13.0 V per 12 V module, or 2.167 V per 2 V cell) is indeed a good 100% SOC voltage, but that's a resting voltage. You only see this voltage after several hours of no charge or discharge. Some AGMs may only rest at a lower voltage when full; it depends on many factors including the battery temperature. As soon as you start charging even a little, the terminal voltage shoots up to around 54 V; that's why the float voltage setting is at this voltage. Only a very small current flows into the battery at this voltage. Note that the voltage is a result of the current; to achieve float charge, the charger puts in a small current, say 1 A, and doesn't increase the current any more when the battery reaches 54 V. If there is a load on the battery of 10 A, the charger finds it has to push 11 A into the battery to maintain 54 V. Ten of those amps flow to the load, and the one amp keeps the battery at 54 V instead of 52 V.
In bulk mode is the actual batteries voltage still lower than 52v assuming no load?
No. In bulk mode, the battery terminal voltage rises from 52 V to around 56 V (I have been ignoring the fact that the charger will stop about 0.5 V short of the setting voltage).
Why is there the linear voltage ramp in bulk mode instead of just pumping 56v into it?
You don't "pump in" a voltage; you pump current (amperes, usually called amps) into a battery. You can think of the battery cables as "pipes" carrying electrons instead of water or gas. It's not quite accurate, but near enough. So many electrons have an electric charge called a coulomb; one coulomb of charge per second is an amp. The transfer of that charge to the battery represents energy; this energy causes chemical changes which result in the ideal battery changing its voltage. So bulk mode for the charger is the same as absorb mode; it keeps increasing the current until either it hits its limit or the battery voltage reaches the target. Float mode is much the same, with a different target voltage.
That is some good info, thanks for writing it up. I have one more question, when in bulk mode it goes up to 56v from a lower voltage, so it crosses the float voltage setting. Why doesn't it think when it hits ~54v in bulk mode that the batteries aren't full at this stage? How does the charger know the state of the battery and what it should be doing when it seems quite unreliable? Is it related to the internal resistance of the battery or something like this? ie When the batteries are full it gets harder and harder to put energy into it and the charger can measure this?

How accurate can a lead battery SOC be reported?

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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by coulomb » Thu, 10 May 2018, 20:35

Edit: Please trim your quotes to just what is needed to establish context. For two posts, you quoted my entire post, including quotes from your questions, when only a sentence or two was needed. It makes it easier to other readers to find information that way. Thanks.
gremlinman wrote:
Thu, 10 May 2018, 11:16
... when in bulk mode it goes up to 56v from a lower voltage, so it crosses the float voltage setting. Why doesn't it think when it hits ~54v in bulk mode that the batteries aren't full at this stage?
When in bulk or absorb modes, the 54 V float setting should be completely ignored; it's aiming for the absorb voltage setting. However, it happens that this is part of the problem with one of the original firmwares' premature float bugs. Although aiming for the absorb setting voltage, at any time when the current is low enough, the firmware checks to see whether it is "eligible to go to float". In this eligibility check, the battery voltage is compared with the setting, and it has to be within half a volt of this setting for a certain period of time. Problem is, there is a typo in their firmware, and they compare against the lower of the two settings (i.e. the float and absorb settings), not the higher of the two as they should. So with original firmware, if the float setting is 54.0 V, you could go to float at 53.5 V if there is a passing cloud for long enough.
How does the charger know the state of the battery and what it should be doing when it seems quite unreliable?
For charging, it only has to know when the battery is full. Usually, it uses the battery current at a certain voltage, but you can use setting 38 (absorb time) to modify that somewhat. With the patched firmware, and I expect the same from original firmware if they ever fix that typo, charging seems quite reliable to me.

If you mean that the state of charge indication is unreliable, then I agree. But it only has to know when the battery is full to stop charging; at other times, it simply doesn't need to know the state of charge.
Is it related to the internal resistance of the battery or something like this?
It doesn't measure the internal resistance.
ie When the batteries are full it gets harder and harder to put energy into it and the charger can measure this?
Yes. This is how the charging algorithm decides when the battery is full. This difficulty of adding more energy is because the voltage of the internal, ideal battery ("inside the real battery", if you like) rises to the point where the charger is forced to reduce the current to a low value to maintain the battery voltage near the absorb voltage setting. In fact, the internal resistance of a fully charged battery is higher than when it is still being charged. That's why a small current into or out of the battery causes a larger voltage change. Once the battery is discharged a little, the same current change will cause a smaller voltage change, so the internal resistance is lower. If the battery voltage ever gets very low, around 20% SOC for lead acid (which should be a very rare occurrence for good life), the internal resistance rises again.
How accurate can a lead battery SOC be reported?
It's quite tricky to get a good reading without measuring the specific gravity of the acid in the battery; this is a chore that seriously large (>= 1000 Ah) flooded lead acid batteries need. But since the battery usually operates only between 100% SOC and about 80% SOC, if you count coulombs (mathematically integrate the battery charge over time), with a few adjustments, it turns out you can get a quite useful indication of "fullness". The "adjustments" include taking into account the Peukert effect, which says that for lead acid especially, a battery loses capacity faster the faster you take energy out of it (i.e. the higher the discharge current).

State Of Charge is about how much energy there is till empty, but you typically don't want to get near empty anyway. To integrate the battery current, you need to have an accurate measure of the battery current. Unfortunately, PIP inverter chargers don't have such a measurement. Reported battery current is inferred (guessed, but it's a somewhat educated guess) from two things that are actually measured: the AC output power, and the AC input power. Some of the recent patches to the patched firmware are to improve this inference, but it's still not good enough for tracking battery capacity. So unfortunately, PIPs as they are now will never be able to track battery capacity accurately, no matter how fancy the firmware. External battery monitoring devices such as these are designed to perform this task properly. They come with a current shunt for accurate battery current measurement, and perform the "adjustments" I mentioned automatically, after you provide them with a few settings.

Some inverter/charger monitoring software, such as ICC, will work with certain brands of battery monitors to display and record accurate SOC, and allow you to perform certain changes when SOC reaches a certain level.

[ Edit: added sentence about battery monitors coming with shunts, and performing adjustments. ]
[ Edit: pH -> specific gravity ]
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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by beccsjb » Fri, 11 May 2018, 06:03

Great reading that has been :)

***Coulomb, do you know if your custom firmware would work on a 'POWER MPS-5K, Model: MPS 5K-48VDC'.***

These inverters are identical to the Axpert. Purchased from Ebay from a company called SWI Power i believe (they claim to manufacture them).

Currently running 3 x in parallel with control from ICC running on Raspberry Pi 3+, though having some stability issues. Feel the existing firmware just doesnt give you enough fine tuning on the low and cut off volts to properly be able to run a LiPoe4 battery (Pylontech).

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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by coulomb » Fri, 11 May 2018, 07:58

beccsjb wrote:
Fri, 11 May 2018, 06:03
Coulomb, do you know if your custom firmware would work on a 'POWER MPS-5K, Model: MPS 5K-48VDC'.
It's difficult to know.
These inverters are identical to the Axpert.
As long as they are genuinely Voltronic Power made, it should work. Do you have a link to the Ebay advertisement? I could not find it.
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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by simat » Fri, 11 May 2018, 09:49

If you want to make a cheap accurate SOC meter and have some electronic skills you can use the TI ADS1115 16 bit Analog to Digital converter.

Here is the circuit for a simple battery monitor using this chip
Image

There is a daughter board based around the ADS1115 for the RaspberryPi boards on ebay. There are also a number of small PCBs based around the ADS1115, just google ADS1115 pcb.

Adafruit has kindly written some python open source drivers if you want to write your own SOC meter software or you could use my software

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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by beccsjb » Fri, 11 May 2018, 11:44


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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by gremlinman » Fri, 11 May 2018, 15:25

coulomb wrote:
Thu, 10 May 2018, 20:35
For charging, it only has to know when the battery is full. Usually, it uses the battery current at a certain voltage, but you can use setting 38 (absorb time) to modify that somewhat. With the patched firmware, and I expect the same from original firmware if they ever fix that typo, charging seems quite reliable to me.
That is some great info you laid out in some combined posts, so thanks for that again!

When you say it uses the battery current at a certain voltage, do you mean when the inverter is on it can guess the SOC because of the voltage at that load? What happens when the inverter isn't on, what current is it using then? I assume it just uses the voltage then?
Last edited by gremlinman on Fri, 11 May 2018, 15:34, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by gremlinman » Fri, 11 May 2018, 15:32

Has anyone had any luck with 48v lifepo4 batteries connected in parallel to a PIP? It seems you can find some relatively cheap scooter type batteries that are 48v and 20AH in capacity. I like the idea of only needing to replace a single unit if one goes bad and if they all have their own BMS then it seems like a simpler setup. But maybe I am overlooking something.

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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by beccsjb » Fri, 11 May 2018, 17:50

Hi Gremlinman,

I’m use LiPo4 batteries, they work great with an accurate SOC indication. I basically only use the bulk charge and float charge voltage of the inverter. The rest of it is controlled from ICC software (www.iccsoftware.co.za) then use ICC’s Pylontech lead to give their software the battery stats, SOC, Temp etc.
I mainly find the cut out voltage on these inverters to be an issue as LiPo4 batteries have quite a quick voltage drop off from 48v, but if you set the cut off too high you don’t get full use of the battery capacity.

The ICC control side is nice, just set your cut off voltage a bit lower and let ICC control the change back to grid based on SOC.

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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by coulomb » Fri, 11 May 2018, 21:12

beccsjb wrote:
Fri, 11 May 2018, 06:03
Coulomb, do you know if your custom firmware would work on a 'POWER MPS-5K, Model: MPS 5K-48VDC'.

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre ... 2360096080
The above link goes to a 24 V model for me. Looking at the 48 V model specifications, I'd say that these are old models, based on the 30 A AC charging and 60 A SCC charging current limits. The photos seem to be identical between the 24 V and 48 V models; I guess they were lazy and used the same set of photos for both.
* Do yours have the black heatsinks on top?
* What is the date of manufacture on the stickers?
* What firmware version(s) does it come with? To handle only 30 A of AC charging, I think it would have to come with main firmware version 52.XX, assuming it's a genuine Voltronic Power model.

I'd be hesitant about using more modern firmware in that hardware, assuming my guesses about their age is correct. It might be too easy to overload the AC charger, for example. The only firmware I have that handles less than 120 A of total charge current is 52.02, and it only handles a maximum of 60 A. Yours presumably allows a maximum of 90 A (60 A from the SCC, and 30 A from AC charging). I've not studied the differences between 52.02 and 52.30 in any detail.
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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by coulomb » Fri, 11 May 2018, 21:24

gremlinman wrote:
Fri, 11 May 2018, 15:25
When you say it uses the battery current at a certain voltage, do you mean when the inverter is on it can guess the SOC because of the voltage at that load?
No, it's all based on total battery current.
What happens when the inverter isn't on, what current is it using then?
Sorry, I forgot to mention that the SCC does measure its DC current output, and this is part of the calculation of total battery current. The inverter is always either discharging the battery, charging from AC, or not used at all. In the first case, they use the AC power and an estimate of efficiency to infer battery current. When AC charging, the use the net power into the charger along with an efficiency estimate to infer battery current. When the inverter is off, the only battery drain is for the internal electronics. In all three cases, there can be SCC charge current, which is simply added to the inferred battery current.

It might help to think of the PIP as having a sensor for battery current, just that it's a bit imprecise (because it's a virtual sensor, not a real one). When the battery voltage is near the absorb voltage setting, and the inferred total battery current is low enough, the battery is deemed to be full. This works even when there are AC loads, because the virtual sensor is measuring total battery current (the result of adding all the charge and discharge currents with the appropriate sign, i.e. treating either discharge or charge currents as negative).
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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by simat » Mon, 14 May 2018, 12:55

Does anyone have any experience or thoughts on how well the PIP4048 handles the battery being disconnected from it with the solar panels still connected and generating power?

In theory, if the SCC has been well designed it should not be a problem but...

The reason for my question is that I will be using a BMS that disconnects the battery minus from the rest of the world when it detects any battery cell going out of its safe operating voltage range or other faults. This should never happen but...

If it is a problem for the SCC if the battery is disconnected I could modify the BMS to disconnect the solar panels minus from the array when an over voltage fault is detected. This would leave the SCC minus PV input sitting at negative the difference between the panel voltage and the battery voltage.

Thanks, Simon
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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by cybersyx » Tue, 15 May 2018, 00:07

Hi, first of all, congratulations for your fantastic forum. Thanks to you I learned a lot of things on my PIP4048 inverter. Now I have a small problem, I'm writing a small management interface with node.js to get the data from the inverter. The commands like QPIGS and QPIRI give me back data without problems but I need to acquire data from the second charge controller (my inverter has two inputs for photovoltaic panels). I tried to use the QPIGS2 command but it does not return any data. Do you have any suggestions? Thanks a lot to everyone

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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by jds686868 » Tue, 15 May 2018, 15:02

Hi folks, not sure if this has been covered already...

If you have multiple PIP 5048MSD with the parallel cards, is it possible to "shutdown" one (or 2) of the inverters when load is low to minimise idle power consumption?

Does turning just the inverter off (little switch underneath the unit) save sufficient power to embark on this strategy? Simple timer?

Thoughts/comments/suggestions most appreciated.

cheers
John

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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by mirceaalex001 » Thu, 17 May 2018, 03:52

Erik89 wrote:
Mon, 05 Feb 2018, 16:37
Yes, I have a Pip4048ms .... the problem remains even when the battery is removed. the relays seem to work well in the mppt card but not released under the 60v photovoltaic input
Hi , did you solve the problem? I have the same issue , He worked great , until now .Thank you !

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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by coulomb » Thu, 17 May 2018, 07:10

mirceaalex001 wrote:
Thu, 17 May 2018, 03:52
Erik89 wrote:
Mon, 05 Feb 2018, 16:37
Yes, I have a Pip4048ms .... the problem remains even when the battery is removed. the relays seem to work well in the mppt card but not released under the 60v photovoltaic input
Hi , did you solve the problem? I have the same issue , He worked great , until now .Thank you !
If you mean that the relay in the Solar Charge Controller comes on and off repeatedly at the end of the day when solar input voltage drops, I believe that this is normal behaviour. The SCC measures the PV voltage under a slight load (running its own electronics including the relay), finds it just barely too low, disconnects, and the PV voltage shoots up again because the small load (the relay coil) is removed. There is enough voltage to keep the SCC running, and the next measurement finds the PV voltage just above the threshold, so it re-connects. Eventually, the PV voltage is so low that even with the reduced load, the voltage is too low to connect, and the SCC stays off.

My apologies if I have misinterpreted the problem.
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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by mirceaalex001 » Thu, 17 May 2018, 14:21

coulomb wrote:
Thu, 17 May 2018, 07:10
mirceaalex001 wrote:
Thu, 17 May 2018, 03:52
Erik89 wrote:
Mon, 05 Feb 2018, 16:37
Yes, I have a Pip4048ms .... the problem remains even when the battery is removed. the relays seem to work well in the mppt card but not released under the 60v photovoltaic input
Hi , did you solve the problem? I have the same issue , He worked great , until now .Thank you !
If you mean that the relay in the Solar Charge Controller comes on and off repeatedly at the end of the day when solar input voltage drops, I believe that this is normal behaviour. The SCC measures the PV voltage under a slight load (running its own electronics including the relay), finds it just barely too low, disconnects, and the PV voltage shoots up again because the small load (the relay coil) is removed. There is enough voltage to keep the SCC running, and the next measurement finds the PV voltage just above the threshold, so it re-connects. Eventually, the PV voltage is so low that even with the reduced load, the voltage is too low to connect, and the SCC stays off.

My apologies if I have misinterpreted the problem.
No, at the end of the day , say pv input 28w , and the relay don`t comes off.... The big problem is in that way , it consumes way more power . The only way to disconnect the relay is to cut off the batteries ( the main power ) . ANd then i can hear the relay goes off . After i reconnect the batteries , is all ok , untill next night .

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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by mirceaalex001 » Thu, 17 May 2018, 14:23

And measured with a multimeter , even with the pv switch off , i have that 46v there , so , somehow is taking dc current from another place .
I have found another way to turn it off ( the panels ) is by setting the max charge to 0 am and then back to desired amp . After it disconnect that relay , is ok , until is connected again, so is like is some dc voltage on the other side of the relay , or is like a circuit that closes with that relay . Do You have any ideas what can be ? Or if i can set the pv input voltage cutoff .... ?Thank you !
Last edited by mirceaalex001 on Fri, 18 May 2018, 04:20, edited 2 times in total.

mirceaalex001
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Posts: 17
Joined: Thu, 17 May 2018, 03:19
Real Name: Alex

Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by mirceaalex001 » Thu, 17 May 2018, 14:44

Is there any way i can change when the pv input to turn off ( like under 60w or something ) ? Thank you guys !

Revlac
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Joined: Sat, 19 Aug 2017, 19:43
Real Name: Aaron
Location: Rosewood

Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by Revlac » Thu, 17 May 2018, 17:24

Had a similar experience.
I have used the PCM60X charge controllers for years now, as I use it along side the 5048HS And have had no problems with them on (custom settings) with the lithium battery bank.
Just a few times where I disconnected the solar panels late in the afternoon just before a storm and noticed it also stayed on for some time but not always, reconnected the panels and then sorted itself out if there was still some solar available.

On the FLA battery bank in the shed on default settings accept that I had the equalize setting enabled, That resulted in the charge controller staying on all night every night, it was trying to equalize the batteries. (There was full battery voltage at the solar inputs when the relay was on)
It maybe I set up the equalize setting incorrectly, I don't know but since I disabled the Equalize I have never had that happen again. (It never stayed on since.)
Hope that helps someone.

Cheers
Aaron

gremlinman
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Re: PIP-4048MS inverter

Post by gremlinman » Thu, 17 May 2018, 17:46

Hi again guys I have a question regarding my batteries connected to the PIP4048ms, I'm on 73.00b firmware.

At ~80w usage reported according to the PIP, and I assume another 50w from the PIP itself, my 8x120ah 12v AGM batteries drop from 48.0v to 47.0v in 3 hours after sundown. Adding that up is about 390WH of electricity used in the time reported. Is this roughly correct given my batteries? I see on numerous calculators they put 12v as the 50% usage in AGM batteries, or 48v in my system. I have a feeling this drop off is too much and my batteries are either duds or something else is going on. Normally I wouldn't run them this low but my generator cord broke and I haven't been able to charge with the generator in 3 days and it has been quite cloudy weather.

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