Controller ERT 48/350

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Acllcainc
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Controller ERT 48/350

Post by Acllcainc »

I just purchased 3 electric mopeds with bike pedal attachments. They seem to be Fly brand the controller says ERT 48/350 which must mean 48 volt 350 watt. They come with 4 6-FM-12 batteries. The place to plug the scooters into the wall looks like the same cord that plugs into a desk top computer, 3 prongs kinda diamond shaped. I used a plug from a computer, because one didn't come with the scooters, and instantly there was smoke and the circuit cut out. I need to know how to recharge the batteries, can I use a 1 amp trickle charger?
Also if I burned out the controller can I upgrade to a 800 watt?
There are so few markings on the bikes it is hard to say what the rear wheel is rated at. Thanks for your help- cheers!
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coulomb
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Controller ERT 48/350

Post by coulomb »

Acllcainc wrote: The place to plug the scooters into the wall looks like the same cord that plugs into a desk top computer, 3 prongs kinda diamond shaped. I used a plug from a computer, because one didn't come with the scooters, and instantly there was smoke and the circuit cut out.
Eek. Maybe it was expecting 110 V? Perhaps you could try one of the others on 110 V, if you have a transformer available.
I need to know how to recharge the batteries, can I use a 1 amp trickle charger?
Probably, but you should find out what kind of batteries those are. For example, if they are NiMH, you probably need to be careful with temperature, or you could start a fire. C/10 should be safe.

[ Searches ] These seem to be lead-acid, 12 Ah:

http://sunbrightpower.en.made-in-china. ... M-12-.html

So a 1 A trickle charge should be safe, and a standard lead-acid charger (with higher current) should work fine. Remember to charge each 12 V module to the same level.
Also if I burned out the controller can I upgrade to a 800 watt?
You could, but you would be hitting the battery harder, which will reduce its life. 800 W is about 16.7 A, or about 1.4 C, so that might be OK.
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antiscab
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Controller ERT 48/350

Post by antiscab »

Acllcainc wrote: They come with 4 6-FM-12 batteries. The place to plug the scooters into the wall looks like the same cord that plugs into a desk top computer, 3 prongs kinda diamond shaped. I used a plug from a computer, because one didn't come with the scooters, and instantly there was smoke and the circuit cut out.


Can you post any pictures by chance?

The connection to the battery on a number of push bike kits I have encountered has used the IEC plug used on most desk top computers for connecting the *batteries* to the controller or charger....

hard to say for certain (unless you use a voltmeter to check the voltage between the pins)

Matt]
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coulomb
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Controller ERT 48/350

Post by coulomb »

antiscab wrote: The connection to the battery on a number of push bike kits I have encountered has used the IEC plug used on most desk top computers for connecting the *batteries* to the controller or charger....

Really? That's scandalous! Image

Since there is a chance of this, definitely don't try 110 V until you can eliminate this possibility.

Using a multimeter on the connector sounds like a very good idea. If you see ~ 50 VDC there, then definitely don't connect the mains (or 110 VAC, obviously) to it.
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Acllcainc
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Controller ERT 48/350

Post by Acllcainc »

Looking at the size of the wires coming from where the IEC plugs in they are not big enough to carry the load coming directly from the wall socket, I found the right charger;
http://www.ebay.com/itm/250895295311?it ... 23&vxp=mtr
(NEW Battery Charger for Electric Scooter Bike 48V-12AH)
I am not able to paste pictures.
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Controller ERT 48/350

Post by coulomb »

Well, here is proof:

Image

I guess we can't always assume that IEC connectors are for mains. Amazing.

So that explains the bang and smoke on the first one; you ended up with mains across the battery pack. How does that pack seem to be behaving?
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coulomb
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Controller ERT 48/350

Post by coulomb »

Acllcainc wrote: Looking at the size of the wires coming from where the IEC plugs in they are not big enough to carry the load coming directly from the wall socket...

Actually, the mains wires would be *lower* current (apart from an initial surge, which is so short the wires don't have to be sized to handle the surge), but higher voltage. Up to a certain point, higher voltage is easy (almost any insulated wire would be able to withstand mains voltage), but higher current requires thicker wires.

That charger puts out only 1.8 A, which means the wires can be fairly thin and still not get too hot. But the mains current (after an initial surge of up to 12 A, according to the Ebay listing) would be less than half an amp.
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woody
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Controller ERT 48/350

Post by woody »

The numbers on the eBay listing don't add up
220V x 12A = 2640 W
48V x 1.8A = 86.4 W
Efficiency = 86.4/2640 = <3%

Maybe backwards:
220 x 1.8A = 396 W
48 x 12A = 576 W
efficiency = 144% ?
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Controller ERT 48/350

Post by antiscab »

I measured 15A between 12 x 48V 3A chargers on the Electrolux

Given PF gets worse as load decreases, it's possible they mean 1.2A, just bad PF (but at 220VA, who cares?)

The batteries should have survived being put across the mains, the (probably) 15A CB should have tripped pretty quickly

I would check the wiring for burnt insulation though (and the connector).

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Controller ERT 48/350

Post by Johny »

My 12 chargers came with IEC inline sockets on the 50 VDC ends as well. I thought it was pretty strange.
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coulomb
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Controller ERT 48/350

Post by coulomb »

woody wrote: The numbers on the eBay listing don't add up
220V x 12A = 2640 W
I assume that the 12A is the maximum surge currrent. I put the run current at under 0.5 A, assuming better than 80% efficiency and power factor. Possibly a little optimistic.
Nissan Leaf 2012 with new battery May 2019.
5650 W solar, 2xPIP-4048MS inverters, 16 kWh battery.
1.4 kW solar with 1.2 kW Latronics inverter and FIT.
160 W solar, 2.5 kWh 24 V battery for lights.
Patching PIP-4048/5048 inverter-chargers.
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