Registration Process for your state.

Technical discussion on converting internal combustion to electric
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a4x4kiwi
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Registration Process for your state.

Post by a4x4kiwi » Tue, 17 Mar 2009, 20:23

I will kick off for NSW having just completed the conversion. It is quite simple.

1. Optional but *very highly* recommended, talk to some engineering signatories before you start to discuss the feasibility of your conversion plans and to ascertain the signatories costs. See VSI15

2. Convert your vehicle considering all relevant NCOP standards. See NCOP 14 in particular for electric drive.

3. Go to a weighbridge and get separate weights for the front and rear axels. This is a signed certificate.

4. Arrange for the signatory to inspect your vehicle. I prepared a photo presentation and a document detailing how I addressed all the relevant NCOP points to send to the signatory in advance has he had not performed a mid construction inspection. I used John Varetimidis from Consulmotive. You will need a stamped engine number on the motor, or on a riveted plate on the motor. I used the last 12 characters of my VIN and this was acceptable to the RTA.

5. After receiving the engineers report, go for a Blue Slip with your weighbridge certificate and engineers report.

6. After the blue slip, you can go and get registered at the RTA. Take your blue slip, weighbridge certificate and engineers report. (If the RTA staff cant figure out how many cylinders and CC to enter on the computer, suggest they change the motive power field to “E”. This bypasses these fields.)

Even tho you are allowed to drive an unregistered vehicle to and from the various inspections, remember you are not at all insured.
Silicon is just sand with attitude.

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HeadsUp
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Registration Process for your state.

Post by HeadsUp » Thu, 19 Mar 2009, 16:51


good work

how much did John charge you for his work ?

i have had a read through his website , he writes for a couple of car magazines.


curious how his pricing will compare to someone like Peter Smith in Camden

Edited : Peter is still overseas and i have not had a reply yet on approximate costs for approval.

cheers.
Last edited by HeadsUp on Thu, 19 Mar 2009, 09:15, edited 1 time in total.

a4x4kiwi
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Registration Process for your state.

Post by a4x4kiwi » Fri, 20 Mar 2009, 14:59

Engineering cert was $1100 inc GST. Travel to my place was included. This beats having to hire a car transport trailer or arrange a tow truck.
Silicon is just sand with attitude.

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cobz1976
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Registration Process for your state.

Post by cobz1976 » Tue, 31 Mar 2009, 04:48

Great this is exactly the information I needed! Thanks for sharing. I'm going to start converting my 95 nissan micra when the rego runs out. But NOT before doing my researching and attending aeva meetings. I dont know where im going to but the batteies in the micra though might need to go with AA batteries!!

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Electrocycle
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Registration Process for your state.

Post by Electrocycle » Tue, 31 Mar 2009, 05:15

Figured I should add my bike registration experience to this too.

I read the various documents and regulations concerning EV conversions, as linked in a4x4kiwi's post above.
I called a couple of engineering signatories to suss out the cost and availability, but didn't get much response.

I set about building the bike and getting it working, as well as providing the necessary safety features and making sure my battery / motor mounts were strong enough, based on figures I'd found online.

I also used most of the original engine mounting bolts and positions to mount my battery and motor, which left no doubt as to their strength!

I called my chosen signatory (Bruce Elson, in Waitara - very local) who came and looked at the bike on a sunday morning!
He was very happy with the construction, and took some notes and measurements to write up the engineer's certificate while I got the weighbridge sorted.
He was involved in the development of the RTA's new engineering approval system, which became an interesting challenge, as they hadn't really thought about electric vehicles, especially motorcycles, yet!

After a few weeks of getting the RTA to adapt their system, the bike was finally squeezed into the provided fields (I think it has 0 cylinders and capacity or something, even though it's listed as electric), and I had my certificate and modification plate (which must be fixed to the chassis like a compliance plate)

After some confusion getting a pink slip - "how do you get it in neutral?" "where's the engine number?" "what do you mean no gears?" "it's on now?" - the rego guy was quite happy once I explained that it could be treated like a normal automatic clutch scooter!
We used the serial number of the Mars motor as the engine number, which was slightly hard to read being small and laser etched, but I'd mounted the motor with the number visible from under the bike.

After the pink slip it was off to the RTA for over an hour of trying to explain to them what I'd done, what it meant, and why it was actually registerable.
Their new online system didn't like many of the fields, and the RTA staff really had no idea what was going on.
This is where I also found a bit of a snag - you need a receipt for your engine when you change your registered engine number.
I didn't have a receipt (bought the motor through a friend who bought two online), but was eventually able to convince them that this was not a normal bike engine and that I did in fact own it!
In future I'd definitely have a receipt of some sort for the motor.
The Engine Whisperer - fixer of things

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