MG ZS EV

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francisco.shi
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Re: MG ZS EV

Post by francisco.shi »

It will more to do with how much you can draw from the controlled load supply. If you can put a 7kw load then there is no reason you can not put a plug fed from the controlled load supply as long as you are aware that it may not have power some times.
Most hot water heaters are 15A and draw about 3.6kwh. So as long as the wire and the relay at the meter is enough to supply 30A it should be ok. Also you need to consider what other loads may be on the supply (like your hot water) so if you draw 30A for the car and your hot water draws 15A then you may trip the supply breaker.
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Re: MG ZS EV

Post by praxidice »

As I've mentioned several times, my question is **NOT** whether or not a 7kw EVSE can be connected to off-peak but rather whether the 7kw EVSE with a 240v 32 amp plug can be (legally) pluggable. Normally, devices connected to off-peak must be hard wired, presumably so people can't switch between peak and off-peak at their whim. Only pool pumps are specifically mentioned in the wiring standard, possibly because they need to be removed for servicing. My argument is that the same should be applicable to EVSE's, however getting that admission out of any official muppet is harder than pulling teeth.

My hot water service is gas, the 240v 32 amp socket for the EVSE is on a completely different circuit in the main switchboard to everything else, and the link to the overhead wires is quite capable of carrying far more amps than I'll ever ask of it.
francisco.shi
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Re: MG ZS EV

Post by francisco.shi »

If you put a 32A plug why wouldn't it be pluggable?
32A plugs are not very common let alone single phase.
So you can install a 32A plug at home but it is unlikely you will find one out in the field unless it is in a factory and even then they are not very common. Most things that need 7kw are not portable and will most likely be 3ph and wired directly which means a 20A 3ph plug (a 20A 3ph plug can supply 19kw) is your best bet.
The only way you are likely to find a 32A in the field is for EV charging but then not sure how common they are.
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smithy2167
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Re: MG ZS EV

Post by smithy2167 »

The power companies only permit certain things to be connected to the controlled load circuit and they have to be hard wired. I believe an EVSE, if hard wired, is acceptable. If they allowed a 32A socket, then you could plug anything into it.

The EVSE does need to be on it's own separate circuit from the switchboard with its own RCBO and nothing else.

Apart from single phase 10/15A outlets, I believe 32A 3-phase is the most common EV charging socket you're likely to encounter in the wild.

The OpenEVSE is only a single-phase charger, so it draws a maximum of 7kw / 32A from a single phase only. This suits me as I want to charge only from the 10kW solar system. The charger can be controlled, using extra monitoring equipment, so that it only uses surplus solar energy.

If your car will handle 3-phase charging (like the Renault Zoe) and your house has 3-phase power (which we do), then the OpenEVSE can be converted to a 3-phase 22kW charger, if you know what you're doing.
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Re: MG ZS EV

Post by reecho »

smithy2167 wrote: Tue, 12 Jan 2021, 07:45
praxidice wrote: Tue, 12 Jan 2021, 02:11 7kw EVSE's are available from OpenEVSE for under $500. Be aware however that they aren't 'portable' in the same context as a 10 amp or 15 amp plug-in EVSE as they need around 30 amps at 240v, and there wouldn't be a regular GPO in the country that will allow as much draw. Very rarely one might find an industrial style 240v 32 amp socket but they use round pins like a three phase outlet and are not compatible with 10 amp / 15 amp plugs. Possibly a 240v 32 amp to 415v 32 amp adaptor would do the job if you can find an accessible three phase outlet.
That's not entirely the case. The charge rate is programmable via a web page and can be adjusted down to 10A, 15A, ... whatever the socket supports.

I have one that's fitted with a 32A 3-phase plug. I also have an adaptor cable to a standard 3-pin plug to allow it to be used with 10A or 15A outlets. Hopefully that will cover most cases.

I paid about $A750 landed for the kit version, and assembled is about $100 more.
You can also change the charge rate on the unit itself via the touch sensor and into the menus. That sensor is an option now on all kits.
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smithy2167
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Re: MG ZS EV

Post by smithy2167 »

reecho wrote: Tue, 12 Jan 2021, 19:20 You can also change the charge rate on the unit itself via the touch sensor and into the menus. That sensor is an option now on all kits.
I have a touch button but I couldn't get it to work. The command to enable it was not recognised. I suspect the front button function has been completely removed.
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reecho
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Re: MG ZS EV

Post by reecho »

smithy2167 wrote: Tue, 12 Jan 2021, 20:50
reecho wrote: Tue, 12 Jan 2021, 19:20 You can also change the charge rate on the unit itself via the touch sensor and into the menus. That sensor is an option now on all kits.
I have a touch button but I couldn't get it to work. The command to enable it was not recognised. I suspect the front button function has been completely removed.
Ah yeah that could be right. it can be enabled using the EU firmware.
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