If you wanted to convert WA's roads to electric...

Discussion about EV/Battery charging infrastructure, Electric highways etc.
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jonescg
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Real Name: Chris Jones
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If you wanted to convert WA's roads to electric...

Post by jonescg »

This is how you'd do it.

Summary:
http://revproject.com/traffic/summary.pdf

Full report:
http://revproject.com/traffic/report.pdf

TL; DR
Putting a minimum of 50 kW charger in every town greater than 250 people with more powerful ones on popular routes - $19 Million.
Putting a minimum of 150 kW charging in every town and roadhouse, and 350 kW chargers on popular routes - $28 Million.

Cost of upgrading half a dozen level crossings on the Armadale line - $146 Million
Cost of upgrading a single flyover intersection on the Tonkin Highway - $120 Million.

If a government wanted an instruction manual on how to future-proof WA's road transport network, it's here. And if the opposition is too lazy to formulate a policy they might as well take this one.
AEVA National Secretary, WA branch chair.
T1 Terry
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Re: If you wanted to convert WA's roads to electric...

Post by T1 Terry »

The old argument that crops up every time on other forums, how do you power these additional EV charging stations?
Big solar and battery installs that connect into the grid nearby to stabilise the grid?
LNG fuelled fuel cells or gensets to provide the energy into a smaller battery bank, that way the LNG could also be an alternate fuel for trucks and diesel powered vehicles in general so a double use for the LNG making it viable to establish the LNG tanks and transport network.
The LNG idea is more likely to appeal to the petroleum industry and probably the truck engine manufacturers as it doesn't do away with the diesel engine that would require diesel where the LNG was not available.

The change over will be a slow start thing so an alternative fuel supply must cater for both EV's and traditional ICE powered vehicles to get the idea off the ground. Many remote towns are reliant on diesel gensets and the fuel station is a part of the town structure because it provides a lot more than just a fuel supply spot. Many are a combination of fuel station, shop, restaurant, pub & bottle shop as well as a motel. The addition of an LNG tank that would provide fuel for their on site genset as well as providing a secondary fuel sale and powering EV charging facilities would be the most likely to appeal to the more remote fuel stations. If it took an hr or more to recharge the EV then the revenue from the restaurant would increase and possibly motel occupancy if the alternate to eating a meal was visiting the bar :lol:
What better way to explain away why you had to over night at where ever, "Had to wait to recharge the vehicle and it pushed me over the safe driving time"

T1 Terry
Green but want to learn
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brendon_m
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Re: If you wanted to convert WA's roads to electric...

Post by brendon_m »

T1 Terry wrote: Tue, 21 Jan 2020, 10:18 The old argument that crops up every time on other forums, how do you power these additional EV charging stations?
The report does go into that. The rollout that is proposed is only really putting in chargers where the grid is stable enough (and lots of big ones where the grid can really take it.)
Part of the argument is that dc chargers peak their use at midday (my guess is wake up, drive, DC charge and have lunch, drive, sleep and charge overnight) which is when solar is normally also at its peak and the grid is in surplus (or will be in the future with more solar installs)
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brendon_m
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Re: If you wanted to convert WA's roads to electric...

Post by brendon_m »

After reading more the recommended /proposed rollout actually allows for gensets to be installed where the grid can't keep up.
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jonescg
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Re: If you wanted to convert WA's roads to electric...

Post by jonescg »

So the WA Charging Infrastructure report is getting a bit of attention. WA Today ran a story on it, and Bridie Schmidt put a story together this morning on the Driven.
All we can hope is that this spurs some decent discussion within the WA government and opposition about embracing EVs and supporting the charging equipment we need.
As Thomas says, WA is a unique case - we need the infrastructure in order to have a viable transport network, but the free market will instinctively avoid the upfront capital expenditure because the returns are so poor, at least in the first few years.

The report also looks into how to encourage more EVs, and reductions in state-imposed charges are an easy place to start. Stamp duty on a new Ioniq is about $3500, and closer to $5k for a Kona. Dropping stamp duty makes the EV premium much smaller over an ICE equivalent, and will help tip more potential buyers over the edge.

Time to pester your local MPs about this!
AEVA National Secretary, WA branch chair.
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