144V DC DC converters

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Greg partridge
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144V DC DC converters

Post by Greg partridge » Sat, 27 Jul 2013, 11:46

I am looking for a 144V DC DC converter for my conversion and would like yo hear others experiences. Which brands are reliable and which ones are worth staying away from ect. Any feedback would be appreciated.

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144V DC DC converters

Post by coulomb » Sat, 27 Jul 2013, 15:21

You'll be tempted to use the Iota, since a lot of people do. But the latest model (as of about a year ago) won't work on DC at all. In case you find an older model that does, be sure to "ruggedise" it as per this page:

http://www.evdl.org/pages/iotamods.html

From CometBoy's post; you may get other suggestions from that thread.

It's not a DC/DC converter, it's an indoor power supply, not designed for car duty. With the ruggedisation, it is passable and inexpensive.
Last edited by coulomb on Sat, 27 Jul 2013, 05:23, edited 1 time in total.
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144V DC DC converters

Post by antiscab » Sun, 04 Aug 2013, 18:30

I have a 36A 12v dc-dc for sale made by meanwell

its another indoor powersupply (although rack mount)

input is rated as 100 - 240vac - but will run fine on a 144vdc nominal battery

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144V DC DC converters

Post by cts_casemod » Fri, 27 Sep 2013, 11:34

Depends on your budget and what you need.
For a simple DC-DC any server power supply can do. They have a built in Boost circuity and work from 90V (I tested some down to 60 with reduced output)and can provide 40Amps of power at 13.x Volts

To actually charge the battery you can get away with an HP DPS 600 power supply set to 13.4V. If attached to a battery they allow for voltage drop working in CC to some extent.

PS: I use one to charge my accessory battery. It might trip if the battery is discharged very deeply, but for normal day to day use it is perfect. I have Electric power steering and always drive with the lights on. Never had a flat battery.

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144V DC DC converters

Post by Vectrix150V » Fri, 27 Sep 2013, 17:18

Another tick here for the DPS 600 - they are easy to mod, and will happily charge a 10AH 24V Lipoly pack at 1.2Kw(!) (2 in series - they need to be modified so that their negative output is isolated from the case)

Cheap as chips too, out of old decommissioned servers. $40 or so, and rated for 12V @ 45A.
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144V DC DC converters

Post by BigMouse » Fri, 27 Sep 2013, 22:35

cts_casemod wrote: Depends on your budget and what you need.
For a simple DC-DC any server power supply can do. They have a built in Boost circuity and work from 90V (I tested some down to 60 with reduced output)and can provide 40Amps of power at 13.x Volts
I'm curious what the highest DC input these could handle is. Have you checked the voltage rating of the devices on the input? I'm having the opposite issue as the OP of this thread, finding DC-DC converters that can operate on 380-420vdc.

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144V DC DC converters

Post by Vectrix150V » Mon, 30 Sep 2013, 15:45

A lot of these multi-voltage converters can take quite high voltages.

I've seen rectified mains as high as 360V DC - most of these units have 400V reservoir caps. The problem will be the voltage rating of the switching devices and the caps.

PFC units regularly run at 400v after the PFC stage - there are plenty of PFC server power supplies. 420V is well within the realms of possibility.

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144V DC DC converters

Post by Peter C in Canberra » Wed, 06 Nov 2013, 00:03

I got the 90Amp, US mains version Iota 5 years and 40,000km ago and it is still going just fine on nominal 144VDC. I put it in a corner of the engine bay that would be well protected.
90Amp is more than you need unless you are running a 12V heater, which I am.
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144V DC DC converters

Post by Astroboy » Tue, 28 Jan 2014, 23:50

Newb question / first post Image.

If the aim is to recharge a 12v accessory battery. Couldn't you just use a cheapish switch mode battery charger? That way it would charge when the battery was in use and float if there was little to no draw on the accessory battery.
eBay has 40amp switch mode battery chargers for a bit over AUD$80.
I have not tried this charger so i am not sure if it's switch mode power supply is suitable for running directly from pack DC voltage.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/360680228173

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144V DC DC converters

Post by Johny » Wed, 29 Jan 2014, 03:22

It's a reasonable sounding idea except you really need 20 to 30 Amps to run the 12V stuff and that would be a rare switch mode battery charger.

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144V DC DC converters

Post by Peter C in Canberra » Wed, 29 Jan 2014, 03:29

That could be OK. The AC input is probably rectified so you could put DC at about 330VDC into it. It says it has 'low input voltage protection' so it probably doesn't like working from what would seem like only half the voltage it is expecting. For a pack voltage of 120-144V you would need a US voltage version. IE 120-144VDC is close enough to 110-120VAC rectified.

Another consideration is how ruggedly constructed it is. You don't want it falling apart internally after 6 months of bumping on the road.
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144V DC DC converters

Post by jonescg » Wed, 29 Jan 2014, 04:03

The other option is a fairly rugged AC powered 12 V battery charger. Have a 12 V battery of the same capacity as your traction pack (80 Ah, 100 Ah) and leave a battery charger permanently attached to it. Then wire the 240 V AC input in parallel with the 240 V supply to your traction pack charger. This way when you charge the main pack, you charge the auxiliary battery. Negates the need for a DCDC, but it does put the whole auxiliary load on the battery, which can be as high as 30-40 A. So maybe a couple of hours of on time.
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144V DC DC converters

Post by Peter C in Canberra » Wed, 29 Jan 2014, 12:12

Yes. If your 12V battery has enough capacity that you would always run out of traction battery charge before you run out of 12V, you can just charge them at the same time from the mains and dispense with the DC/DC converter. If it appeals, you could also then have solar charging for the 12V system in parallel using standard, readily available parts. With or without the solar bit you would get a little bit more range from a particular traction battery because you don't have some of its energy taken off to the 12V system.
You would also need to make sure your 12V charger would finish charging before your traction battery charger. IE the 12V charger has to be faster so you always have a full 12V battery before the traction battery is full.
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