Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by Richo » Thu, 31 May 2018, 12:28

magnify wrote:
Wed, 30 May 2018, 16:04
What would help a lot is if Arvio, the importer, put a full pdf of the manuals for the 3.55 kWh and 7.1 kWh units online---ASAP. With a proper brief on what it is, what it contains and what it really does, in practice.
But from what I understand Arvio are either in on the scam or have been duped by it - probably the latter.
Its just unfortunate that if a claim against this product is made in Australia it will be the importer, Arvio, that will suffer.
And given this has been part funded by the VIC govt we are talking Millions of $$.

This is why I mentioned that they are better off having one independently tested.
$3.5k vs $3.5M
At least they could say they made an effort to determine if the product was fraudulent.
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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by weber » Thu, 31 May 2018, 18:26

magnify wrote:
Wed, 30 May 2018, 16:46
Agree, even basic examination, sans simming, makes clear a domestic E storage will benefit from more supercaps and less battery array, maybe 75:25 (at least it won't hurt, except costs more), while a regularly used car would maybe suffice with 90:10 (thereabout), an e-bike 100% caps.
Except that graphene supercaps that obey the known laws of physics (as opposed to magical ones), occupy about 20 times the volume of an LTO battery with the same energy storage capacity, and presently cost about 50 times as much.

And none of these applications actually require the sub-30-second charge/discharge capability of a supercapacitor. Even the 6 minutes of an LTO battery is overkill.
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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by magnify » Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 15:59

Given the following comment, by Weber, I decided to try to narrow-down what the Kilowatt Labs "Supercapacitor Array", can, and can not be.

Weber said:
Except that graphene supercaps that obey the known laws of physics (as opposed to magical ones), occupy about 20 times the volume of an LTO battery with the same energy storage capacity, and presently cost about 50 times as much.
Can't work with that, so I'll try to tighten it up some.

The volume of a "coke can" varies greatly, from 135 ml, up to 500 ml. There are 19 different sizes of coke can:

https://www.ad-informatica.com/davidean ... lsizes.jpg

(gawd bless the internet)

The US standard can size is 355 ml, and Australian standard can, 375 ml.

Phrases like, "the size of a coke can", don't help us much. We need farads per millilitre (or cubic cm) to assess energy-verses-volume implications of the claimed graphene supercaps F capacity.

But let's assume the existing ultracaps equal, 355 ml of volume, for 3000 farads.

The Arvio graphene supercapacitor brochure spec says that the 3550 Wh Kilowatt Labs "Capacitor Module", has these dimensions:

Dimensions
(w x d x h)
600mm x 534mm x 200mm (+/-2%)

[NOTE: +/- 2% variation in width is +/-12 mm, so two cases of this product could vary in width, by as much as 24 mm! I don't think I've ever seen an error margin on a case's dimension specs before, obviously not CAD/CAM manufacture.]

Looking at the image of the "Super Capacitor" array, on the Kilowatt Labs site ( http://kilowattlabs.com/energy-storage-technology.html ), it is reasonable to presume the 160 rectangular prism devices displayed there must be oriented width wise (600 mm wide) across the case. Given that layout, the individual device's width dimension, can be no wider than 25 mm, in order to fit that whole supercap array layout into a 600 mm wide case.

From visual examinations of the depicted supercap array's architecture, it appears the individual devices are at most 4 times longer than they are wide.

So it's very likely the 160 retangular prism supercap device's dimensions are (or else very close to) 25 mm × 25 mm × 100 mm.

Volume of a cylinder with diameter 25 mm, length 100 mm = 49.1 ml.

But volume of a rectangular prism, with width 25 mm, height 25 mm, length 100 mm = 62.5 ml.

160 devices × 62.5 ml = 10,000 ml*

* Total volume of all 160 depicted supercap array devices as scaled to just fit into a case that's 600 mm wide.

So Kilowatt Labs have, at best, no more than 10,000 ml of volume for graphene (with that particular architecture) to acheive its claims, per a single 2.7V and 3550 Wh "Capacitor Module".

10,000 ml ÷ 355 ml [coke cans] = 28.2 cans

28.2 coke cans × 3000F = 84,507F (Supercap)

So we have a fairly solid basis for volume comparisons with a 355 ml USA 'coke can' @3000F for an ultracap (if that's useful).

Kilowatt Labs is claming a graphene energy density just less than 1/3 that best density recently published. They claim other companies are currently bringing similar graphene-based products to market (see quote at bottom).

MicrotronTec claims to manufacture the graphene supercaps in China. MicrotronTec says:

http://microtrontec.com/technologies.php
Graphene-Based Ultracaps
Unlike conventional ultracaps using Activated Carbon, Microtron’s storage cells use graphene. The higher surface area of graphene allows Microtron to deploy ultracap cells with capacitance values of up to 140,000 farads vs the 3,000 farads in most ultracapacitors on the market today.
Assuming the 140,000F refers to their Capacitor Module" prototype's F value:

140,000F [supercap array] ÷ 160 devices = 875F per supercap device.

If a 355 ml ultracapacitor is 3000F, then the deduced calculated 62.5 ml devices in the Kilowatts supercap array, would be:

355 ml ÷ 62.5 ml = 5.68 devices per coke can volume.

3000F ÷ 5.68 = 528.2F per device (if an ultracap)

160 devices ÷ 528.2 = 84.507F (ultracap)

That is, if it were a currently available ultracap tech, rather than graphene.

84.507F ÷ 140,000F = 0.603

So MicrotronTec are claiming their graphene supercapacitor devices have 39.9% more farads per ml, than the best current ultracaps, and that they can make and package the graphene caps extremely cheaply, into these long lived devices.

Frankly, it's possible that MicrotronTec's prototype 'Capacitor Module' can package 140,000 farads into a case of 600mm x 534mm x 200mm.

Having said all the above, we don't know that these 25 mm × 100 m supercaps actually exist, and if they do, what farads they actually store per device. But 140,000F is the only number they have claimed.

Kilowatt Labs's marketing chiefs seem to think the buyer should not know such things--just trust us.

Nah, sorry, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence---or get rejected.

We need images and specs on the actual devices, and full colour photos of the interior of a 3.55 kWh case, and an explanation of what each part is, and what these do, in full.

Both Kilowatt Labs and Paul (Supercaps) from Arvio claim a "very low percentage" of Li battery array is used, in the "Capacitor Module" (which is in line with 'TCrypytos' conclusion that a large expensive battery array makes little sense electronically, or economically). Plus the Arvio Supercapacitor Brochure specs says:

"Self-discharge | 5% after 25 days"

But that implies a substantial Li battery array is drained at that point, and at best there's just 95% charge left in the supercaps, but this will be a lot less storage remaining than the insinuated 95% of total 3550 Wh.

Yeah, right, would it really be more like ~50% of the total rated storage after that 25 days on standby?

A customer should know that sort of thing.

Why so much ambiguity? Why do we even need to figure this out? Where's the transparancy? If Kilowatt Labs wants to sell these in Australia, they need to accept that it's time to lift the dress and show us what they've got.
Graphene supercapacitors serve as energy storage alternative to traditional electrolytic batteries. Among advantages are fast charging, long life span and environmentally friendly production. Graphene supercapacitors produced by Skeleton Technologies have been commercially available since around 2015 and were first used in some specialized applications instead of traditional batteries. By 2017, commercial graphene supercapacitor units were available for industrial power applications, with maximal power output of 1500 kW. In 2016, Adgero announced a regenerative braking system (KERS) for large trucks that employed a graphene-based supercapacitor.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphene

Given the rate of development, it's not out of the question that this graphene "Capacitor Module" is for real. But there is no evidence yet that this device is one of them. Equally, there's no clear evidence that it isn't, yet.

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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by weber » Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 16:34

Thanks magnify. I take back all those bad things I said about you. Oh wait! No. I only thought them. ;)

I feel you're getting the picture now, and making a real contribution.

When I, and others in this thread, referred to 3000 F supercaps or ultracaps as being "the size of a coke can", we were of course referring to the standard 375 mL Aussie coke can, although I admit I had no idea there were so many other sizes. :) Multiple manufacturers make 3000 F in a can that's 60 mm in diameter and 138 mm long. I just calculated that's 390 mL. But the difference between 390 mL and 375 mL is irrelevant when Arvio are claiming to have 3000 F in a can only 18 mm in diameter and 65 mm long. That's only 17 mL.

And that's ignoring the fact that they are only operating them between 2.2 V and 2.7 V (44 V to 54 V for the module). When you take that into account you find that you'd actually need about 9000 F to store the energy they are storing in those 18 x 65 mm cans.

Of course there's no problem storing what they need to store in those 18 x 65 mm cans if they are lithium titanate batteries. And we know from the test data Arvio have kindly provided, that they are indeed batteries, due to the pronounced knee in their voltage time curve (at around 2.1 V).

If Arvio were to do a constant current charge at a much lower current, say 0.5 A or less, and if they were willing to allow the cell to go up to 2.8 V or more, I predict we would see another knee at the high end.
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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by magnify » Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 17:07

Thank you Weber.

I would say the 18 mm × 65 mm tubes probably are the lithium "Battery Array", but these are certainly not:

http://kilowattlabs.com/energy-storage-technology.html

Those are the supercaps (if present, and I have the scaling about right from their image) and 25 mm × 25 mm × 100 mm, for 62.5 ml per prism × 160 prisms, for ~10,000 ml of graphene.

The question is, are these (as apparently claimed to be) the only supercaps within the device?

If so, are each of the 160 caps made up of smaller caps? ... in order to get to 1,200 devices total, within the case?

Or are there actually 1,040 Li batteries in the "Battery Array" when Kilowatt Labs says (and Arvio repeated) that it's just a "very small percentage" of Li batteries in a "Charge Retention Circuit"?

One might ask, what's the difference between a "Charge Retention Circuit" and a regular battery, when both are circuits that retain charge?

And if not, how do you fit 1,040 × (18 mm × 65 mm) tubes within the case's remaining volume? :?

(not invoking Tardis volume rules yet)

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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by weber » Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 17:21

[Edit: Sorry. I was preparing the following post at the same time you were preparing yours above.]
magnify wrote:
Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 15:59
Given the rate of development, it's not out of the question that this graphene "Capacitor Module" is for real. But there is no evidence yet that this device is one of them. Equally, there's no clear evidence that it isn't, yet.
When you say there's no clear evidence yet that the Kilowatt Labs Sirius module isn't a capacitor module, have you at least accepted that the 18 x 65 mm unlabelled blue cylindrical devices that Arvio have tested are not capacitors? And do you accept it when Arvio tell us that the 3550 Wh Sirius module contains printed circuit boards carrying a total of 1200 of these cylindrical devices, connected as 60 parallel x 20 series? And that the image of a circuit board in this video shows that they are square packed (rather than hexagon packed)?

If so, you could calculate how much space is left in that case, in which to fit supercapacitors? Don't forget it has a motorised contactor and control and monitoring circuitry in there too.

Or do you think that some of the unlabelled blue cylindrical devices are supercaps, and Arvio just happens never to have tested one of those?
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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by magnify » Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 17:45

Ah, now this is the confusion, there are two units available, one is 3550 Wh, and the other is 7100 Wh, and I think it's the 7100 Wh which has the 1,200 devices, and its dimensions are as follows (per Arvio's Brichure page 5)

Dimensions (w x d x h)
600mm x 490mm x 330mm

So that's 320 supercaps, and 880 batteries.

Thus the 3550 Wh unit will have only 600 devices inside, and 160 of those are supercaps, thus 440 of them are the square-packed PCB mounted batteries, and its case is only 200 mm high. i.e.

Dimensions (w x d x h)
600mm x 534mm x 200mm

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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by coulomb » Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 17:55

magnify wrote:
Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 15:59
MicrotronTec claims to manufacture the graphene supercaps in China. MicrotronTec says:

http://microtrontec.com/technologies.php
Graphene-Based Ultracaps
Unlike conventional ultracaps using Activated Carbon, Microtron’s storage cells use graphene. The higher surface area of graphene allows Microtron to deploy ultracap cells with capacitance values of up to 140,000 farads vs the 3,000 farads in most ultracapacitors on the market today.
Assuming the 140,000F refers to their Capacitor Module" prototype's F value: ...
(My underlining)

But Microtrontec seem (to me) to be comparing cells with cells. So they are claiming an almost 47x improcement in capacitance per cell, without stating (at least in that quote) what the volume is. You seem to be assuming that the entire array of capacitors comes to 140,000 F (correct me if I'm wrong).

Also, in your calculations, you seemed to gloss over the fact that these are presumably still 2.7 V devices, so they need 20 in series (along with amazing balancing technology, but let's leave that aside for now). When you put 20 capacitors in series, the whole thing has twenty times less capacitance than each individual capacitor.

Also, SuperCaps has stated that there are 1200 3000 F capacitors (cells), arranged in a 20S 60P configuration. This gives a total of 9,000 F, which at 54 V holds a little over 3500 kWh. But of course, that assumes an amazing DC-DC that bidirectionally boosts (while discharging) or bucks (while charging) something like 10 V (wild guess) to or from 44 V. SuperCaps has mentioned the electronics here. So I don't think that the 140,000 F figure is supposed to apply. Maybe they are claiming that they could fit 140,000 F into the same ~375 ml volume as standard techniques store 3000 F, but here they are using the smaller form factor to store an industry-standard 3000 Farads.

And of course, they are claiming that the smaller form factor that they chose just coincidentally happens to be just the right size to implement the whole thing in low-end LTO battery cells, with no fancy electronics required, apart from that required to drive the LCD screen, any communications, and presumably balance the 60P LTO cells (a standard BMS, for this latter part).
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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by coulomb » Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 18:10

magnify wrote:
Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 17:45
Ah, now this is the confusion, there are two units available, one is 3550 Wh, and the other is 7100 Wh, and I think it's the 7100 Wh which has the 1,200 devices, and its dimensions are as follows (per Arvio's Brichure page 5)

Dimensions (w x d x h)
600mm x 490mm x 330mm
The title of the tread is 3.5 kWh, and there has been no mention of other sizes. So I think when Paul (Supercaps) said 1200 devices, it was for the 3.5 kWh model. Besides, the total energy storage for 1200 3000 F devices in a 20S60P configuration works out to just a little over the stated capacity for the whole device. These guesses are getting a little wild, it seems to me. We have some information from @Supercaps, let's work with that.

[ Edit: I forgot to mention that when I went to check page 5 of the brochure, the page would not load for me. They seem to be having server issues. ]
[ Edit 2: It finally loaded, but I was on the wrong site anyway. The easiest way to access the data seems to be from this URL (which could change over time):
http://arvio.com.au/wp-content/uploads/ ... ompact.pdf ]
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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by weber » Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 18:14

magnify wrote:
Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 17:45
Ah, now this is the confusion, there are two units available, one is 3550 Wh, and the other is 7100 Wh, and I think it's the 7100 Wh which has the 1,200 devices, ...
I think you'll find that Arvio have not imported the 7100 Wh module at all. I think they were fairly clear that there are 1200 of those devices in the one they have, which is the 3550 Wh module. There's a video, or perhaps it was the BZE podcast, where Paul (Supercaps) explains why they have not imported the 7100 Wh unit.
[Edit: Yup. He explains why they don't import the 7100 Wh module, in the BZE podcast from 22:34 to 23:49.]

Image      

That T shaped arrangement of devices reminded me of something I once saw in an electric vehicle, so I did a reverse image search and found where KiloWatt Labs took that image from. I must have seen an image of the battery in GM's Bolt, which apparently evolved from that in GM's much earlier EV1. It turns out that T-shape is the width of a full-sized car, and its length fits between the front and rear wheels. It was made in 2002 from 160 (you got that right) 2700 F 2.5 V ultracapacitors. The whole car-sized pack only stored 375 Wh and weighed 168 kg. It was used in an electric dragster so it only had to last 20 seconds. Here's the story with the original image:
https://www.altenergymag.com/articles/0 ... tents.html

So that image was just another red herring from KiloWatt Labs.

[Edit: Soon after this was posted, KiloWatt Labs changed their website so that the image discussed and linked on the left above is no longer present. It was a copy of this: Image]
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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by magnify » Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 19:22

@ Coulomb

This is the 3550 Wh unit:

https://arvioshop.com.au/supercapacitor/

The 7100 Wh unit is displayed on page 3 of the "Independence Day" Brochure:

http://arvio.com.au/independence-day-brochure%20

And the individual unit spec details are where I stated, in the Supercapacitor Broachure, from this link (pages 4 & 5):

http://arvio.com.au/supercapacitor-brochure

See the Titles given, on pages 4 and 5 of the spec tables in the first Brochure, as there are two different units being described.

I've seen pictures of five different versions of these units so far.

And take note that Paul from Arvio also said in several prior comments to this thread that there's a whole range of these capacitor modules, with more coming.

And I think you'll find 'Supercaps' was talking about the unit that he was then testing at the time (7100 Wh) not the one in the title of the thread.

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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by magnify » Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 19:43

coulomb wrote:
Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 17:55
magnify wrote:
Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 15:59
MicrotronTec claims to manufacture the graphene supercaps in China. MicrotronTec says:

http://microtrontec.com/technologies.php
Graphene-Based Ultracaps
Unlike conventional ultracaps using Activated Carbon, Microtron’s storage cells use graphene. The higher surface area of graphene allows Microtron to deploy ultracap cells with capacitance values of up to 140,000 farads vs the 3,000 farads in most ultracapacitors on the market today.
Assuming the 140,000F refers to their Capacitor Module" prototype's F value: ...
(My underlining)

But Microtrontec seem (to me) to be comparing cells with cells. So they are claiming an almost 47x improcement in capacitance per cell, without stating (at least in that quote) what the volume is. You seem to be assuming that the entire array of capacitors comes to 140,000 F (correct me if I'm wrong).

Also, in your calculations, you seemed to gloss over the fact that these are presumably still 2.7 V devices, so they need 20 in series (along with amazing balancing technology, but let's leave that aside for now). When you put 20 capacitors in series, the whole thing has twenty times less capacitance than each individual capacitor.

Also, SuperCaps has stated that there are 1200 3000 F capacitors (cells), arranged in a 20S 60P configuration. This gives a total of 9,000 F, which at 54 V holds a little over 3500 kWh. But of course, that assumes an amazing DC-DC that bidirectionally boosts (while discharging) or bucks (while charging) something like 10 V (wild guess) to or from 44 V. SuperCaps has mentioned the electronics here. So I don't think that the 140,000 F figure is supposed to apply. Maybe they are claiming that they could fit 140,000 F into the same ~375 ml volume as standard techniques store 3000 F, but here they are using the smaller form factor to store an industry-standard 3000 Farads. ...
I'm really not sure of anything MicrotronTec's claiming. I doubt even they could figure out what they meant. Maybe they wrote it in another langage and Google Translate just did the best it could, so they posted that. :roll:

So I have no confidence that the 140,000F refers to the supercap array.

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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by magnify » Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 19:55

@ Weber

Well that clinches it, Kilowatt Labs is a scam.

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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by Chad » Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 20:58

I think You are way off on a tangent here ,magnify..
"Supercaps" ( Paul ) has previously clearly stated what is inside the Sirius "box"..1200 , 3000F, 18650 sized, " supercapacitor" units, arranged in 2 layers. There are also photos showing some of the detail posted previously.
Logicaly, the 7.1kWh Sirius unit is simply 2 more layers of the same configuration.
There is no room inside those boxs for any other makor components.
Your fundamental misunderstanding is assuming that the graphic of 160 "supercapacitor modules". to be part of the contents of the "Sirius box" ....when infact it is most likely simply an impression of how 160 of the Sirius boxs might be arranged to become a large (1136 kWh,...160x7.1 ), Supercapacitor storage bank
As others have indicated, if these are 3000F supercapacitor devices, they could be selling them loose for 10-50 times the price they are valuing them at in this Sirius unit.

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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by TCryptos » Sat, 02 Jun 2018, 08:26

Well that clinches it, Kilowatt Labs is a scam.
Given the tenor your initial comments here, I'm not clear on whether or not this is sarcasm, or an acceptance of what the known facts are telling us :|

I'm assuming sarcasm though. @weber beat me to the punch on the image search. Here's another site with the same image:

https://www.altenergymag.com/article/20 ... rsity/204/

Examining the XMP data on the image at Kilowatt Labs compared to the older, original image shows that the image was modified using Adobe Photoshop CS5 Windows - this is the 2010 version. No other useful metadata is present.

Here's the web hosting site that Microtrontec.com is using: https://turnkeyinternet.net/ Note the pricing. This is the same server that hosts rick-e.com and shares the same Google AdSense account ID, presumably to save money.

Here's the web hosting site that Kilowattlabs.com is using: https://www.digitalocean.com/pricing/ Note the pricing for the low end droplets, which is all that is needed to support the measured 50 visits / day.

These do not look like outfits that have a factory in China capable of making devices that signficantly outperform other known supercapacitors. Rather they look like cheap websites thrown together to create an impression, as long as one doesn't dig too deeply.

Given that the 'rectangular things' image is copied from a image of a capacitor pack that is the width of a car and weighs 370 lbs, from a university electric dragster project from the early 2000s, can we now go back to the known facts: the Sirius box contains cylindrical things that are the same size as and have the same electrical properties as LTO batteries?

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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by magnify » Sat, 02 Jun 2018, 09:52

Chad wrote:
Fri, 01 Jun 2018, 20:58
I think You are way off on a tangent here ,magnify..
Incorrect Chad, you just didn't read the link.

The following is the full-text of the Kilowatt Labs page where that diagram (of the alleged 160 supercapacitors) comes from. As you can plainly see, THEY were saying that that's what's inside the case. It was not me presuming what's in the case.

http://kilowattlabs.com/energy-storage-technology.html
KiloWatt Labs
Energy Storage - Technology

SIRIUS | SUPERCAPACITOR BASED ENERGY STORAGE

Architecture


http://kilowattlabs.com/img/img-Pseudo- ... nected.jpg

Supercapacitors Connected in a Series and Parallel Combination

Supercapacitors
are connected in series and parallel and balanced through a set of algorithm based microcontrollers that monitor, balance and control the entire process.

Control

Current Control, Balancing and Charging Circuit

Sirius' proprietary algorithm-based balancing, charging and control circuit actively balances and stabilizes the supercapacitors that are connected in series, delivers linear discharge voltage, and specific energy of 115 Wh/kg.

Software Algorithm

The heart of the system are the algorithms programmed into the microcontrollers that monitor and control the operation of the storage system.
Follow Us

KiloWatt Labs Contact Us
© 2015-2017 KiloWatt Labs - All Rights Reserved. Designed and Maintained by Kamyana
That's clearly referring to what's claimed to ALSO be INSIDE of the "SIRIUS" capacitor module box.

But it becomes irrelevant anyway as Weber's last comment puts beyond doubt that everything Kilowatt Labs asserted was a fake created by a Pakistani tech-crook, running a con-job with his mates.
Waseem Ashraf Qureshi | Inventor, CTO and Co-founder

Waseem is the inventor of all of Kilowatt Labs' technologies.

Waseem is the youngest ever recipient of the National Science Award in Pakistan, awarded at the age of 15. He has subsequently received several other such national accolades.

Waseem leads the Company's invention and technology improvement programs, which are developing disruptive technologies for other industries and continually improving the technologies already invented. His brilliance lies in using existing parts and materials (usually 'off-the-shelf') and bringing efficiencies through innovative and creative software design. Operating in a resource constrained environment while growing up, Waseem has always believed that there is a better and cheaper way of doing things.

Waseem has invented and designed prolifically in various capacities starting with the invention of the first uninterruptible power supply (UPS) system in Pakistan in 1984 at the age of 14, which he successfully commercialized the following year at the age of 15.

He also invented, designed, and launched the first car tracking system in Pakistan, as well as several telecom applications. He is a prolific researcher, designer and developer of new technologies and now is focused on energy products, including development of wireless charging technology, the first fast charging battery and the first low -energy, compressor -free air-conditioning system. He has also designed a solar system to withstand extreme temperatures for the Pakistan army.

He is married with 3 children, lives in Dubai and is a graduate in electronics from the University of Engineering & Technology, Lahore, Pakistan.

Omer Ghani | CEO and Co-founder

Omer is the CEO and Co-founder of Kilowatt Labs and leads the Company ... Omer has two children, lives in New York, and is a graduate of Columbia University ...

Larry Seibert | Chairman, President and Co-founder

Larry began his career as an accountant for Peat Marwick (currently KPMG). He then moved on to Goldman Sachs as a Senior Analyst ... He currently mentors students at Columbia University at both the graduate and undergraduate level ... He lives with his wife and two children in New York City.
http://kilowattlabs.com/about-us.html

Qureshi would have had some disposable slob answering the phones at the purported Washington and New York phone numbers of "Kilowatt Labs" and "Amber&Waseem". (I'm guesing "Amber" is the wife of "Waseem" Qureshi)


PS: Have a nice day, Waseem.

brunohill
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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by brunohill » Mon, 04 Jun 2018, 22:59

Why not just use one of these?
www.oreillyauto.com/flux-capacitor?q=121g

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Johny
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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by Johny » Tue, 05 Jun 2018, 08:00

brunohill wrote:
Mon, 04 Jun 2018, 22:59
Why not just use one of these?
www.oreillyauto.com/flux-capacitor?q=121g
This is such a common mistake. Flux capacitors don't store energy as electricity, they store chronotons. These are released in a sub millisecond burst when the device exceeds a certain velocity with respect to a large nearby mass.


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Richo
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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by Richo » Thu, 07 Jun 2018, 12:31

People are so gullible.
I think the operative word here is "meant o work".
Clearly Zoran has no concept of reality.
Help prevent road rage - get outta my way! Blasphemy is a swear word. Magnetic North is a south Pole.

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Richo
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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by Richo » Thu, 07 Jun 2018, 12:46

Here's another coming out of the woodwork.
http://hycarbinc.com/about/
So this Company Hycarb is on the verge of making carbon based buttons cells that supposedly have 5x the energy density as the lithium rechargeable.
Their plan is then to move on to pouch cells that are 10kWh in capacity then MWh modules.

BUT that is not the news...
The news is that http://www.signetinternationalholdings.com/ has offered to buy Hycarb.

If you had a goose and worked out how to get golden eggs out of it the first thing to do is SELL the goose...
Given Signet is a trading company I suspect the scam is based on shares etc.
Neither website has anything substantial.

But it all comes back to graphene/carbon.
Help prevent road rage - get outta my way! Blasphemy is a swear word. Magnetic North is a south Pole.

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Richo
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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by Richo » Thu, 07 Jun 2018, 12:50

Supercaps wrote:
Sat, 10 Mar 2018, 16:43
There is a lithium electrode in the graphene super capacitors.
Sound familiar

Magic carbon.
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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by TCryptos » Thu, 07 Jun 2018, 14:05

hycarbinc.com is hosted by Endurance https://www.endurance.com/, which is basically a business hackerspace.

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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by ChemicalHorizon » Thu, 07 Jun 2018, 21:25

Richo wrote:
Thu, 07 Jun 2018, 12:46
5x the energy density as the lithium rechargeable.
Shut up and take my money! How good will my hand stick vacuum be with these things in it!

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Re: Arvio 3.5kWh drop-in-battery-replacement supercapacitor on sale

Post by Adverse Effects » Fri, 08 Jun 2018, 08:38

ChemicalHorizon wrote:
Thu, 07 Jun 2018, 21:25
Richo wrote:
Thu, 07 Jun 2018, 12:46
5x the energy density as the lithium rechargeable.
Shut up and take my money! How good will my hand stick vacuum be with these things in it!
noooooo careful you will suck the carpet off the floor

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