Charging

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Thalass
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Charging

Post by Thalass »

I was just wondering... What type of plug is most commonly used for conversions? a standard 15amp 240v plug would be the most useful, if you needed to charge away from home (assuming you have an on-board charger), but it'd be slow.

Gav with his KiwiEV is using an garage-side charger with a many-pin connector and a multitude of wires from his petrol filler to the batteries. This to me would be less desirable, in case I'm running low on charge and am away from home.

What about a three-phase connector? Not as useful, but surely 3-phase 240v would allow you to charge at a much higher rate than single-phase. Higher current capacity, and three phases of voltage/current to play with. As opposed to one 240v/15a. Not as useful, admittedly, but if your BMS/Charge Controller/Whatever can handle it then perhaps it'd be better?

I suppose if you wanted to you could have one three phase plug for fast charging, and one regular plug for slow charging, though if you're at home you're more likely to have the time to let the car charge up slowly, I guess. Heh.


Anyway, I was just wondering about it. And, I suppose, the sort of options available with most systems. I'd like to go with a regular 240v plug, and have the option to charge while driving from a generator (though that'd be at a later date), probably from a second plug next to the trailer lights plug.
Last edited by Thalass on Wed, 08 Dec 2077, 07:05, edited 1 time in total.
I'll drive an electric vehicle one day.

zeva
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Charging

Post by zeva »

Thalass wrote: I was just wondering... What type of plug is most commonly used for conversions? a standard 15amp 240v plug would be the most useful, if you needed to charge away from home (assuming you have an on-board charger), but it'd be slow.
Almost everyone I know just uses a standard male 3-pin single phase plug, usually installed where the fuel filler nozzle used to be.
Thalass wrote:Gav with his KiwiEV is using an garage-side charger with a many-pin connector and a multitude of wires from his petrol filler to the batteries. This to me would be less desirable, in case I'm running low on charge and am away from home.
Yeah, if I remember correctly he's using a multitude of separate (offboard) chargers, one for each of his batteries? Seems like a complicated solution to me (though single 12V battery chargers are pretty cheap alright).
Thalass wrote:What about a three-phase connector? Not as useful, but surely 3-phase 240v would allow you to charge at a much higher rate than single-phase. Higher current capacity, and three phases of voltage/current to play with. As opposed to one 240v/15a. Not as useful, admittedly, but if your BMS/Charge Controller/Whatever can handle it then perhaps it'd be better?
The main problem with this is.. finding a three phase charger! But there's no technical reason why it couldn't be done..
Thalass wrote:Anyway, I was just wondering about it. And, I suppose, the sort of options available with most systems. I'd like to go with a regular 240v plug, and have the option to charge while driving from a generator (though that'd be at a later date), probably from a second plug next to the trailer lights plug.
Yeah the easiest way to go with this is to use an off-the-shelf genset which will put out 240VAC, and just hook that up to the same on-board single phase charger you use for normal stationary charging.

The catch is that most single phase chargers can only charge at a couple of kW, whereas an average vehicle cruising at highway speed requires about 5kW..
Ian Hooper
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